Early Tuesday morning, a series of terrorist attacks ripped across Brussels, the Belgian capitol, leaving at least 31 dead. We're following live updates to the story here. Similar to the December massacre in Paris, the attacks were quickly followed by a public outpouring grief, sympathy and solidarity, taking the form of makeshift memorials and specially lit landmarks.

Here is a selection of reactions from Europe and around the world:

People light candles at a memorial set up outside the stock exchange in Brussels. Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP

The pencils in the cartoon below are a reference to the terrorist attacks on the offices of French satire magazine Charlie Hebdo, last January:

Pakistanis chant slogans during a rally to condemn the Brussels attack, in Multan, Pakistan. Asim Tanveer/AP

Just hours after terrorist attacks in Brussels left dozens dead or wounded, President Barak Obama spoke directly to the Cuban people Tuesday morning. He condemned the violence saying, "We must unite, we must be together regardless of race, nationality, or faith," and then shifted his focus to US Cuban relations.

In the televised broadcast from the Gran Teatro in Havana, he urged the citizens of Cuba to embrace American democracy, outlining the steps he believes they should take in order to ease the path to normalization of relations between the two neighboring countries.

"I have come here to bury the last remnants of the Cold War in the Americas," Obama said.

Since Obama announced the historic move to restore relations in December of 2014, questions have repeatedly arisen concerning the timing of this reconciliation after more than five decades of hostilities. On Tuesday, Obama said that the approach employed by the United States since the Cold War was no longer working and that "we have to have the courage to acknowledge that truth."

He also called on Congress to lift the embargo to help expedite the normalization process.

Donald Trump, the Republican front-runner, took no time to respond to Obama's speech, slamming the president for being in Havana at all.


In the wake of the Brussels terror attacks Tuesday morning, GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz suggested that the United States "empower law enforcement to patrol and secure Muslim neighborhoods before they become radicalized."

Here is the full statement from the Cruz campaign:

Cruz: We Can No Longer Surrender to the Enemy Through Political Correctness
WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, presidential candidate Ted Cruz responded to the horrific terrorist attacks in Brussels:
"Today radical Islamic terrorists targeted the men and women of Brussels as they went to work on a spring morning. In a series of coordinated attacks they murdered and maimed dozens of innocent commuters at subway stations and travelers at the airport. For the terrorists, the identities of the victims were irrelevant. They –we—are all part of an intolerable culture that they have vowed to destroy.
"For years, the west has tried to deny this enemy exists out of a combination of political correctness and fear.  We can no longer afford either. Our European allies are now seeing what comes of a toxic mix of migrants who have been infiltrated by terrorists and isolated, radical Muslim neighborhoods.
"We will do what we can to help them fight this scourge, and redouble our efforts to make sure it does not happen here. We need to immediately halt the flow of refugees from countries with a significant al Qaida or ISIS presence. We need to empower law enforcement to patrol and secure Muslim neighborhoods before they become radicalized.
"We need to secure the southern border to prevent terrorist infiltration. And we need to execute a coherent campaign to utterly destroy ISIS. The days of the United States voluntarily surrendering to the enemy to show how progressive and enlightened we are are at an end. Our country is at stake."

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., appears to have conceded that the Republican Party has alienated Hispanic voters and will have to rely increasingly on white voters to win in November.

"An interesting phenomenon right now is the huge turnouts for the Republican primaries, low turnout for the Democrat primaries," McCain said in a Sunday appearance on the Phoenix-based show Politics in the Yard. "Now if all those people would get behind the Republican candidate, I think we could win this election despite the alienation, frankly, of a lot of the Hispanic voters.”

McCain will face perhaps his toughest re-election fight this fall. A former champion of comprehensive immigration reform, he is likely to struggle in a year in which Donald Trump is pushing Latinos away from the Republican Party. McCain will face off against several Republican primary challengers in August. Polls show McCain currently tied with his general election opponent, Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick (D-Ariz.).

McCain has steered clear of Donald Trump, who is the favorite to win the Arizona Republican primary on Tuesday night. The Hill reported last week that McCain would not attend any of the rallies Trump held in Arizona this weekend. McCain endorsed his colleague Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) in the presidential primary; after Graham dropped out, McCain said he would not endorse anyone.

In an interview with Fox News on Tuesday morning, Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump twice failed to correct host Brian Kilmeade's mistaken assertion that one of his top foreign policy advisers, Walid Phares, is Muslim.

"Donald, we just talked to Walid Phares," Kilmeade said. "We talked to Dr. Zuhdi Jasser yesterday, Ambassador Khalilzad—he's done great things for this country. What do all three have in common? They're Muslims."

"Yes, that's true," Trump said.

A few minutes later, Kilmeade returned to the topic of Phares, who, Trump announced yesterday, is advising his campaign. "A lot of people listening right now might be misinterpreting your message in the past and currently that you have a problem with Muslims—you don't have a problem with Muslims," Kilmeade said. "In fact you just hired one, Walid Phares, to work for you." Again, Trump appeared to agree.

But Phares is not Muslim. In fact, he is about as far from being a Muslim as one can get. As Adam Serwer reported five years ago, Phares was once a top political official in a sectarian Christian militia in Lebanon that targeted Muslims:

During the 1980s, Phares, a Maronite Christian, trained Lebanese militants in ideological beliefs justifying the war against Lebanon's Muslim and Druze factions, according to former colleagues. Phares, they say, advocated the hard-line view that Lebanon's Christians should work toward creating a separate, independent Christian enclave. A photo obtained by Mother Jones shows him conducting a press conference in 1986 for the Lebanese Forces, an umbrella group of Christian militias that has been accused of committing atrocities.

Later in the interview, Kilmeade offered a correction, noting that Phares is actually a Christian. But Trump was twice asked specifically about Phares' religious identity and never pushed back.

Maybe it was a lousy earpiece?

Donald Trump wasted no time in backing torture (again) after this morning's terrorist attacks in Brussels.

"Waterboarding would be fine" for Salah Abdeslam, one of the alleged participants in the massacre in Paris last November, Trump said on the Today Show. He's previously said he'd like to do "a hell of a lot worse" than waterboarding to terrorism suspects, and on Tuesday he repeated his call to change the laws to allow further acts of torture: "If they could expand the laws, I would do a lot more than waterboarding. You have to get the information from these people."

But terrorism expert Malcolm Nance, the head of the Terrorism Asymmetrics Project and a veteran of Navy intelligence, took Trump to task for doing the propaganda work of ISIS.

"Good God, they're probably cutting videos of this right now," Nance said on MSNBC about Trump's comments. "Donald Trump right now is validating the cartoonish view that they tell their operatives…that America is a racist nation, xenophobic, anti-Muslim, and that that's why you must carry out terrorist attacks against them…It's irresponsible and it needs to stop."

The three Republican presidential candidates had three very different takes Tuesday morning on how the United States should respond to the terror attacks in Brussels.

Donald Trump appeared on Fox and Friends, where he again called to "close up our borders."

"It’s going to get worse and worse because we are foolish, we are foolish," Trump said. "We can't allow these people, at this point, to come into the US."

Ted Cruz repeated his campaign refrain to name and declare war on the enemy: "radical Islamic terrorists."

Later Tuesday morning, Cruz held a press conference, where he escalated his response, calling for the United States to use its "full force and fury" against ISIS.

John Kasich struck a very different tone, calling to strengthen America's alliances:

President Barack Obama is scheduled to address the Cuban people in a live, televised broadcast. In his speech, he is expected to make his first remarks on the explosions in Brussels. Watch it live here.

Firefighters and first responders stand next to blown out windows at Zaventem Airport in Brussels.

Update, March 25, 9:49 a.m. EST: Belgian media outlets are reporting multiple blasts in the Schaerbeek neighborhood of Brussels. CNN reports the blasts were heard during a large police operation.

Update, March 23, 4:20 p.m. EST: Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan said that one of the attackers was arrested near the Syrian border last June. After he was deported to the Netherlands, Turkey warned Belgium of his suspected ties to terrorist activities. The Guardian is reporting that he was one of the two suicide bombers who carried out the explosion inside Zaventam airport.

Update, March 23, 7:24 a.m. EST: Belgian news agencies have identified two of the bombers in Tuesday's attacks as brothers Khalid el-Bakraoui, 27, and Ibrahim el-Bakraoui, 30. Both men had been sought by Belgian authorities since the March 15 raid that captured Salah Abdeslam, who is suspected of involvement in the Paris attacks. The Belgian authorities have reportedly arrested a third suspect.

Update, March 22, 1:30 p.m. EST: Belgian police have issued an arrest warrant for a man believed to have participated in carrying out the Brussels attacks. Authorities also released the following photo of three men suspected to be behind the explosions:

Update, March 22, 11:42 a.m. EST: The Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attacks in Brussels, according to an ISIS-related "news agency," reports the Associated Press. The claim said the attacks were in response to Belgium's support in the fight against ISIS.

Update, March 22, 9:34 a.m. EST: Belgian authorities have raised the death toll to at least 31 dead.

The city of Brussels is under lockdown after multiple explosions rocked its main airport and a subway station early on Tuesday morning.

Authorities believe a suicide bomber carried out the attack at the Zaventam international airport. Another bombing targeted a metro station in the Brussels suburb of Maalbeek. All flights and public transportation have been canceled in the wake of the attacks.

Tuesday's explosions come just days after Salah Abdeslam, the fugitive who is suspected of carrying out the Paris attacks in November, was shot and arrested in a terror raid in the Belgian capital.

"I express my complete solidarity with the Belgian people," French President Francois Hollande said in a press conference. "Terrorists struck Brussels, but it was the whole of Europe that was targeted."

This is a breaking news post. We will update as new information becomes available.

On Monday, Bernie Sanders did something his campaign has been toying with for months: He gave a speech laying out his vision for Middle East peace. With the other four remaining major party candidates traveling to Washington, DC, to speak at the American Israel Public Affairs Committee conference, Sanders opted to stay in Utah, where he is banking on a strong showing in Tuesday's Democratic caucus. Prior to addressing a packed Salt Lake City gymnasium, he spoke to a smaller crowd, offering the speech his people say he would have delivered at AIPAC.

"A lasting a peace will have to recognize Palestinians are entitled to control their own lives, and there is nothing human life needs more than water."

Consistent with his ongoing critique of economic inequality, Sanders, who is Jewish and spent time at a kibbutz after college, offered a plea for a more humane handling of the Israel–Palestine conflict. "To be successful, we have to be a friend not only to Israel, but to the Palestinian people, where in Gaza, they suffer from an unemployment rate of 44 percent—the highest in the world—and a poverty rate nearly equal to that," Sanders said, according to a prepared text of his remarks.

Israel, he argued, is compounding the suffering with its own aggressive policies. Sanders called on Israeli Prime Minister Bibi Netanyahu to pull back settlements in the West Bank and turn over hundreds of millions of shekels in tax revenue to Palestinians. Peace, he also said, "will mean a sustainable and equitable distribution of precious water resources so that Israel and Palestine can both thrive as neighbors…Right now, Israel controls 80 percent of the water reserves in the West Bank. Inadequate water supply has contributed to the degradation and desertification of Palestinian land. A lasting a peace will have to recognize Palestinians are entitled to control their own lives, and there is nothing human life needs more than water."

As he moved on to a rehashing of his positions on ISIS and the Iran nuclear deal, Sanders hit on familiar themes, framing the failure of Middle Eastern nations to stop ISIS, in part, as a failure of wealthy elites. If Qatar could spend $200 billion on World Cup soccer stadiums, he said, it could surely spend as much fighting terrorists. Singling out Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, both of which have benefited from America's defense budget, Sanders added that, "wealthy and powerful nations in the region can no longer expect the United States to do their work for them."

"It is easy to use a war to remove a tyrant from power—but it is much more difficult to prevent total chaos afterward."

Last November, Sanders talked about his plans to fight ISIS as part of a larger policy speech on democratic socialism, but after initially hinting that a major foreign policy address would follow, his campaign backed down. During debates, he's often pivoted away from foreign policy to focus on domestic issues. But national security is one area where the differences between he and Hillary Clinton—and for that matter, the entire Republican field—are stark. Although he never mentioned Clinton by name, he acknowledged his Democratic rival in passing by taking a shot at one of their biggest areas of disagreement, military interventions.

"It is easy to use a war to remove a tyrant from power—but it is much more difficult to prevent total chaos afterward," Sanders said. "Just look at the cost we have paid in Iraq—a war I was proud to oppose. Just look at the chaos in Libya. It is my firm belief that the test of a great nation, with the most powerful military on Earth, is not how many wars we can engage in, but how we can use our strength to resolve international conflicts in a peaceful way."

You can read his speech here.