Globalization of sushi

| Sat Dec. 23, 2000 4:00 AM EST

Sushi is big business across the industrialized world. A bluefin tuna can get caught off the coast of Massachusetts, flown to buyers in Japan, then resold to a chef in Boston.

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Besides being one tired tuna, that fish represents the fundamental illogic of globalization, as FOREIGN POLICY reports. Its value will be traded many times across currencies and oceans, and it will travel thousands of miles, creating jobs and economic stimulation, only to be eaten eventually just a few days and a few miles from where it took its last swim. It isn't efficient or sensible, but it is profitable.

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Of course, the global sushi market has also stimulated overfishing of tuna. And because Atlantic tuna can cross into various jurisdictions, conservation regulations are tough to enforce, and usually come second to economic interests.

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