Egypt's Revolutionary Graffiti

Street graffiti in Egypt evokes the January 25th uprising—and suggests that the revolution is by no means over.

A year after Egyptians launched a revolution in Tahrir Square on January 25th, 2011 and ousted former president Hosni Mubarak, graffiti immortalizing the uprising covered walls, buildings, and doors throughout the country. The graffiti evokes the repression of Mubarak's rule and the celebrations following his ouster. But as repression and unrest continue throughout the region, paricularly in Syria, we are also reminded that the so-called Arab Spring is still very much history in the making.

Also check out our slideshow of photographs documenting Egypt's year of revolution.

January 25, 2011. Source: Gigi Ibrahim/Flickr

 

Freedom. Source: Gigi Ibrahim/Flickr

 

Graffiti remembering Twitter and Facebook's role in the revolution. Source: Gigi Ibrahim/Flickr

 

Source: Gigi Ibrahim/Flickr

 

Inspired by Banksy. Source: Gigi Ibrahim/Flickr

 

Graffiti on a wall near Talaat Harb Square. Source: Jano Charbel/Flickr

 

Source: Gigi Ibrahim/Flickr

 

Revolution first. Source: Gigi Ibrahim/Flickr

 

Graffiti near the America University in Cairo. Source: Ted Swedenburg/Flickr
 
Liberated Tahrir Square. Source: Gigi Ibrahim/Flickr

 

Tribute to Mina Daniel, an Egyptian activist who was killed October 9. Source: Gigi Ibrahim/Flickr
 
Graffiti of Mubarak. Source: Ramy Raoof/Flickr

 

Depiction of SCAF's warning to protesters. Source: Gigi Ibrahim/Flickr

 

Graffiti showing solidarity with Syria. Source: Hanibaael/Flickr