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The Italian Job: How the Pentagon Is Creating a New European Launchpad for US Wars

The percentage of US forces in Europe based in Italy has tripled since 1991.

| Thu Oct. 3, 2013 11:21 AM PDT

Location, Location, Location

Bases in Italy have played an increasingly important role in the Pentagon's global garrisoning strategy in no small part because of the country's place on the map. During the Cold War, West Germany was the heart of US and NATO defenses in Europe because of its positioning along the most likely routes of any Soviet attack into Western Europe. Once the Cold War ended, Germany's geographic significance declined markedly. In fact, US bases and troops at Europe's heart looked increasingly hemmed in by their geography, with US ground forces there facing longer deployment times outside the continent and the Air Force needing to gain overflight rights from neighboring countries to get almost anywhere.

Troops based in Italy, by contrast, have direct access to the international waters and airspace of the Mediterranean. This allows them to deploy rapidly by sea or air. As Assistant Secretary of the Army Keith Eastin told Congress in 2006, positioning the 173rd Airborne Brigade at Dal Molin "strategically positions the unit south of the Alps with ready access to international airspace for rapid deployment and forced entry/early entry operations."

And we've seen the Pentagon take advantage of Italy's location since the 1990s, when Aviano Air Base played an important role in the first Gulf War and in US and NATO interventions in the Balkans (a short hop across the Adriatic Sea from Italy). The Bush administration, in turn, made bases in Italy some of its "enduring" European outposts in its global garrisoning shift south and east from Germany. In the Obama years, a growing military involvement in Africa has made Italy an even more attractive basing option. 

"Sufficient Operational Flexibility"

Beyond its location, US officials love Italy because, as the same military official told me, it's a "country that offers sufficient operational flexibility." In other words, it provides the freedom to do what you want with minimal restrictions and hassle.

Especially in comparison to Germany, Italy offers this flexibility for reasons that reflect a broader move away from basing in two of the world's wealthiest and most powerful nations, Germany and Japan, toward basing in relatively poorer and less powerful ones. In addition to offering lower operating costs, such hosts are generally more susceptible to Washington's political and economic pressure. They also tend to sign "status of forces agreements"—which govern the presence of US troops and bases abroad—that are less restrictive for the US military. Such agreements often offer more permissive settings when it comes to environmental and labor regulations or give the Pentagon more freedom to pursue unilateral military action with minimal host country consultation.

While hardly one of the world's weaker nations, Italy is the second most heavily indebted country in Europe, and its economic and political power pales in comparison to Germany's. Not surprisingly, then, as that Pentagon official in Italy pointed out to me, the status of forces agreement with Germany is long and detailed, while the foundational agreement with Italy remains the short (and still classified) 1954 Bilateral Infrastructure Agreement. Germans also tend to be rather exacting when it comes to following rules, while the Italians, he said, "are more interpretive of guidance."

War + Bases = $ 

The freedom with which the US military used its Italian bases in the Iraq War is a case in point. As a start, the Italian government allowed US forces to employ them even though their use for a war pursued outside the context of NATO may violate the terms of the 1954 basing agreement. A classified May 2003 cable sent by US Ambassador to Italy Melvin Sembler and released by WikiLeaks shows that Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi's government gave the Pentagon "virtually everything" it wanted. "We got what we asked for," wrote Sembler, "on base access, transit, and overflights, ensuring that forces... could flow smoothly through Italy to get to the fight."

For its part, Italy appears to have benefited directly from this cooperation. (Some say that shifting bases from Germany to Italy was also meant as a way to punish Germany for its lack of support for the Iraq War.) According to a 2010 report from Jane's Sentinel Security Assessment, "Italy's role in the war in Iraq, providing 3,000 troops to the US-led effort, opened up Iraqi reconstruction contracts to Italian firms, as well as cementing relations between the two allies." Its role in the Afghan War surely offered similar benefits. Such opportunities came amid deepening economic troubles, and at a moment when the Italian government was turning to arms production as a major way to revive its economy. According to Jane's, Italian weapons manufacturers like Finmeccanica have aggressively tried to enter the US and other markets. In 2009, Italian arms exports were up more than 60%.

In October 2008, the two countries renewed a Reciprocal Defense Procurement Memorandum of Understanding (a "most favored nation" agreement for military sales). It has been suggested that the Italian government may have turned Dal Molin over to the US military—for free—in part to ensure itself a prominent role in the production of "the most expensive weapon ever built," the F-35 fighter jet, among other military deals. Another glowing 2009 cable, this time from the Rome embassy's Chargé d'Affaires Elizabeth Dibble, called the countries' military cooperation "an enduring partnership." It noted pointedly how Finmeccanica (which is 30% state-owned) "sold USD 2.3 billion in defense equipment to the US in 2008 [and] has a strong stake in the solidity of the US-Italy relationship."

Of course, there's another relevant factor in the Pentagon's Italian build-up. For the same reasons American tourists flock to the country, US troops have long enjoyed la dolce vita there. In addition to the comfortable living on suburban-style bases, around 40,000 military visitors a year from across Europe and beyond come to Camp Darby's military resort and "American beach" on the Italian Riviera, making the country even more attractive.

The Costs of the Pentagon's Pivots

Italy is not about to take Germany's place as the foundation of US military power in Europe. Germany has long been deeply integrated into the US military system, and military planners have designed it to stay that way. In fact, remember how the Pentagon convinced Congress to hand over $600 million for a new base and related construction in Vicenza? The Pentagon's justification for the new base was the Army's need to bring troops from Germany to Vicenza to consolidate the 173rd brigade in one place.

And then, last March, one week after getting access to the first completed building at Dal Molin and with construction nearly finished, the Army announced that it wouldn't be consolidating the brigade after all. One-third of the brigade would remain in Germany. At a time when budget cuts, unemployment, and economic stagnation for all but the wealthiest have left vast unmet needs in communities around the United States, for our $600 million investment, a mere 1,000 troops will move to Vicenza.

Even with those troops staying in Germany, Italy is fast becoming one of several new pivot points for US warmaking powers globally. While much attention has been focused on President Obama's "Asia pivot," the Pentagon is concentrating its forces at bases that represent a series of pivots in places like Djibouti on the horn of Africa and Diego Garcia in the Indian Ocean, Bahrain and Qatar in the Persian Gulf, Bulgaria and Romania in Eastern Europe, Australia, Guam, and Hawai'i in the Pacific, and Honduras in Central America.

Our bases in Italy are making it easier to pursue new wars and military interventions in conflicts about which we know little, from Africa to the Middle East. Unless we question why we still have bases in Italy and dozens more countries like it worldwide—as, encouragingly, growing numbers of politicians, journalists, and others are doing—those bases will help lead us, in the name of American "security," down a path of perpetual violence, perpetual war, and perpetual insecurity.

David Vine, a Tom Dispatch regular, is associate professor of anthropology at American University, in Washington, DC. He is the author of Island of Shame: The Secret History of the US Military Base on Diego Garcia. He has written for the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Guardian, and Mother Jones, among other places. He is currently completing a book about the effects of US military bases located outside the United States. For more of his writing, visit www.davidvine.net. To stay on top of important articles like these, sign up to receive the latest updates from TomDispatch.com here.

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