May/June 2009

May/June 2009

Kiss your golden years goodbye.



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DEPARTMENTS

OUTFRONT

The dragon that ate Wall Street; does the government know you're addicted to Gossip Girl?; how Washington sabotaged Iraq's corruption cop; the GOP vs. the Internets; NuvaRing's risky business; America's most notorious lockup; MoJo readers to the rescue

NOTEBOOK

Banks of America


Why real capitalists aren't afraid to nationalize (and why it's our only choice).

MEDIA JONES

Ted Genoways on how the Mad Men are spinning the recession; comics legend Harvey Pekar channels Studs Terkel; plus more book (The Invisible Hook: The Hidden Economics of Pirates, Blood and Politics, Fordlandia, ), film (Burma VJ, Handmade Nation), and music (Country Club, Songs in the Night, Márcio Local Says, Headstunts) reviews.

MOJO INTERVIEW

Kabul's Splendid Son


The Kite Runner author Khaled Hosseini talks about homecomings and Taliban-censored flamingos.

Biz Stone Is Totally Tweeting This

Gwen Ifill keeps her balance

PRACTICAL VALUES

Give When It Hurts


Brother, you can spare a dime: why you should give away more of your hard-earned cash.

FEATURES

The FBI's Least Wanted

The FBI's Least Wanted


Special Agent Bassem Youssef was one of the bureau's top terror cops. So why was he exiled to a desk job?


Obama's Great Gamble

Obama's Great Gamble


Fixing Afghanistan: mandatory or mission impossible?


Waste Not Want Not


We're burying the planet in garbage. Here's how to dig out.

Waste Not Want Not

Bill McKibben talks trash

The Big Apple vs. the little green bin

Meet the zero-waste zealots

Can we learn to live with (and even love) plastic?

Good riddance to industrial rubbish

Toxic sludge hits the fan


Can You Love a Child of Rape?

Can You Love a Child of Rape?


Fifteen years after the genocide, Rwandan women are raising the children of their attackers.