Lefty Eco-Terrorist Added to FBI’s “Most Wanted”


On the heels of the uproar caused by the release of a Department of Homeland Security memo warning that returning veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan could be recruited by right-wing, domestic terrorist groups, the FBI announced Tuesday the addition of a fugitive eco-terrorist to its “Most Wanted Terrorists” list. It’s the first time a domestic terrorist has been added to the list, created in late 2001 after the 9/11 attacks; others, like anti-abortion bomber Eric Rudolph, have appeared among the “Ten Most Wanted” list, an altogether different and longer-running list established under J. Edgar Hoover in 1950. Osama Bin Laden bears the dark distinction of appearing on both.

The fugitive in question is Daniel Andreas San Diego, 31, a computer specialist wanted for his alleged role in bombing attacks on two office buildings in 2003. He’s thought to be hiding in Central America, possibly Costa Rica. From the FBI:

Daniel Andreas San Diego is wanted for his alleged involvement in the bombing of two office buildings in the San Francisco, California, area. On August 28, 2003, two bombs exploded approximately one hour apart at the Chiron Corporation in Emeryville. Then, on September 26, 2003, one bomb strapped with nails exploded at the Shaklee Corporation in Pleasanton. San Diego was indicted in the United States District Court, Northern District of California, in July of 2004.

San Diego has ties to animal rights extremist groups. He is known to follow a vegan diet, eating no meat or food containing animal products. In the past, he has worked as a computer network specialist and with the operating system LINUX. San Diego wears eyeglasses, is skilled at sailing, and has traveled internationally. He is known to possess a handgun.

Reward’s $250,000, in case you’re interested.

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