Democrats Ask Mulvaney to Testify on Quid Pro Quo Allegations

Chris Kleponis/Zuma

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Update, 5:15 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 5: Mulvaney has reportedly declined to testify, with a White House spokesperson calling the impeachment investigation a “ridiculous, partisan, illegitimate proceeding.”

Impeachment investigators have asked acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney to submit to a deposition later this week, suggesting that he may have been “directly involved” in the alleged quid pro quos that led to the impeachment investigation against President Donald Trump.

In a letter asking Mulvaney to appear before House investigators on November 9, the chairs of three congressional committees cited Mulvaney’s potentially “substantial first-hand knowledge and information relevant to the House’s impeachment inquiry.”

House Intelligence Committee chair Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), Foreign Affairs Committee chair Eliot Engel (D-NY), and Oversight and Reform Committee chair Carolyn Maloney (D-NY) wrote, “The investigation has revealed that you may have been directly involved in an effort orchestrated by President Trump, his personal agent, Rudolph Giuliani, and others to withhold a coveted White House meeting and nearly $400 million in security assistance in order to pressure Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to pursue investigations that would benefit President Trump’s personal political interests, and jeopardized our national security in attempting to do so.”

Mulvaney recently told reporters that Trump had indeed withheld military aide in part to pressure Ukraine to launch investigations into Democrats. He later attempted to retract that admission.

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You expect the big picture, and it's our job at Mother Jones to give it to you. And right now, so many of the troubles we face are the making not of a virus, but of the quest for profit, political or economic (and not just from the man in the White House who could have offered leadership and comfort but instead gave us bleach).

In "News Is Just Like Waste Management," we unpack what the coronavirus crisis has meant for journalism, including Mother Jones’, and how we can rise to the challenge. If you're able to, this is a critical moment to support our nonprofit journalism with a donation: We've scoured our budget and made the cuts we can without impairing our mission, and we hope to raise $400,000 from our community of online readers to help keep our big reporting projects going because this extraordinary pandemic-plus-election year is no time to pull back.

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