Email Dump


Email from my old college roommate:

What is wrong with Democrats? I’m not talking about losing in MA. Sure, it’s an unforced error, but it happens. I’m talking about the self-destructive spasms that follow.

And this from a friend:

I can’t decide which is worse — watching what happened yesterday, or watching them react to what happened yesterday today. I can barely turn on my computer. It’s so pathetic.

And another:

There is nothing in the Democratic conference that inspires confidence.  They are simply not trustworthy.  At all. Make no mistake: This failed for lack of leadership.  And I guess the leaders have to reap the whirlwind or whatever.

And another:

Frankly, I don’t know which is worse — the finger pointing, or the calls for slowing down, restarting, or scrapping HCR.  You can find more professionalism in your local student council race.  To call this amateur hour actually dignifies the whole thing.

And finally this from a Senate staffer over at Josh Marshall’s site:

The worst is that I can’t help but feel like the main emotion people in the caucus are feeling is relief at this turn of events. Now they have a ready excuse for not getting anything done. While I always thought we had the better ideas but the weaker messaging, it feels like somewhere along the line Members internalized a belief that we actually have weaker ideas. They’re afraid to actually implement them and face the judgement of the voters. That’s the scariest dynamic and what makes me think this will all come crashing down around us in November.

And remember: I and my readers are mostly the sober, pragmatic sorts. Willing to compromise. Sensitive to political realities. Etc. And even we’re disgusted. I can’t remember ever being as embarrassed to be a Democrat as I am today.

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