Some Weak Sanctions on Iran


The draft resolution imposing UN sanctions on Iran was released yesterday, and sure enough, it’s pretty weak tea. The Washington Post summarizes:

Among other measures, the resolution would expand an asset freeze and travel ban against individuals and entities linked to Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps….The resolution would establish an embargo on large weapons systems such as battle tanks, combat aircraft and missiles […] but would not include the comprehensive arms embargo sought by the United States and France. Iran could continue to buy light weapons.

….The resolution would establish a “framework” for inspections of suspect cargo at sea or in ports….Moreover, financial institutions that establish “reasonable grounds” to believe Iranian banks or other firms are evading sanctions are called upon to block any financial transactions, including the issuance of insurance or reinsurance, related to banned proliferation activities.

….The Obama administration failed to win approval for key proposals it had sought, including restrictions on Iran’s lucrative oil trade, a comprehensive ban on financial dealings with the Guard Corps and a U.S.-backed proposal to halt new investment in the Iranian energy sector.

Even at that, though, Turkey and Brazil are pissed because this takes the shine off the pledge they got from Iran on Monday to ship some of its uranium stockpile out of the country for further enrichment. It’s not clear how big a deal this is in the long run, especially since UN sanctions aren’t generally very effective anyway, but Tehran has certainly played its cards cleverly. The full text of the resolution is here.

DOES IT FEEL LIKE POLITICS IS AT A BREAKING POINT?

Headshot of Editor in Chief of Mother Jones, Clara Jeffery

It sure feels that way to me, and here at Mother Jones, we’ve been thinking a lot about what journalism needs to do differently, and how we can have the biggest impact.

We kept coming back to one word: corruption. Democracy and the rule of law being undermined by those with wealth and power for their own gain. So we're launching an ambitious Mother Jones Corruption Project to do deep, time-intensive reporting on systemic corruption, and asking the MoJo community to help crowdfund it.

We aim to hire, build a team, and give them the time and space needed to understand how we got here and how we might get out. We want to dig into the forces and decisions that have allowed massive conflicts of interest, influence peddling, and win-at-all-costs politics to flourish.

It's unlike anything we've done, and we have seed funding to get started, but we're looking to raise $500,000 from readers by July when we'll be making key budgeting decisions—and the more resources we have by then, the deeper we can dig. If our plan sounds good to you, please help kickstart it with a tax-deductible donation today.

Thanks for reading—whether or not you can pitch in today, or ever, I'm glad you're with us.

Signed by Clara Jeffery

Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our newsletters

Subscribe and we'll send Mother Jones straight to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate

Share your feedback: We’re planning to launch a new version of the comments section. Help us test it.