Fight disinformation: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter and follow the news that matters.


Bernard Avishai writes about the steady deterioration of Israel’s infrastructure despite respectable economic growth:

In case after case, rightist coalitions have insisted the money was simply not there, and so Western standards for “quality of life” remained out of reach; the country’s most responsible citizens have shrugged, more or less, and returned to work, knowing that rates of participation in Israel’s workforce is actually among the lowest in OECD nations, around 57%, because of the amount of money supporting ultra-orthodox “learning.”

The Carmel brush fires have suddenly given all of this frustration a powerful symbol — a kind of Katrina event. Just who have the governments been serving?

Perhaps the signal moment came on Channel Two Friday evening, when the fires were at their worst, and the newscast’s most forceful commentator, Amnon Abramovich, let loose with what a great many in the audience was thinking. “If you are not a settler or a Haredi lobby,” he said (I am paraphrasing),”you might as well forget getting anything from the Israeli government in recent years.”

I don’t know Israel well enough to weigh in on this, but it certainly squares with an awful lot that I’ve read in recent years. The steady rise of ultra-orthodox influence in Israel seems to be every bit as dangerous to its future as anything happening in the West Bank or Gaza — though the two are so tightly related that I imagine it’s hardly possible to speak of them as separate phenomena in the first place.

I’d be interested in comments on this. But for obvious reasons, please be extra careful to keep them civil.

We've never been very good at being conservative.

And usually, that serves us well in doing the ambitious, hard-hitting journalism that you turn to Mother Jones for. But it also means we can't afford to come up short when it comes to scratching together the funds it takes to keep our team firing on all cylinders, and the truth is, we finished our budgeting cycle on June 30 about $100,000 short of our online goal.

This is no time to come up short. It's time to fight like hell, as our namesake would tell us to do, for a democracy where minority rule cannot impose an extreme agenda, where facts matter, and where accountability has a chance at the polls and in the press. If you value our reporting and you can right now, please help us dig out of the $100,000 hole we're starting our new budgeting cycle in with an always-needed and always-appreciated donation today.

payment methods

We've never been very good at being conservative.

And usually, that serves us well in doing the ambitious, hard-hitting journalism that you turn to Mother Jones for. But it also means we can't afford to come up short when it comes to scratching together the funds it takes to keep our team firing on all cylinders, and the truth is, we finished our budgeting cycle on June 30 about $100,000 short of our online goal.

This is no time to come up short. It's time to fight like hell, as our namesake would tell us to do, for a democracy where minority rule cannot impose an extreme agenda, where facts matter, and where accountability has a chance at the polls and in the press. If you value our reporting and you can right now, please help us dig out of the $100,000 hole we're starting our new budgeting cycle in with an always-needed and always-appreciated donation today.

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate