On Jose Antonio Vargas, Undocumented Immigrant

Jose Antonio Vargas.<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/campusprogress/2719329139/sizes/z/in/photostream/">Campus Progress</a>/Flickr


Kevin is on vacation, so Andy Kroll and I are filling in for a few days.

In April 2008, Jose Antonio Vargas, then a reporter at the Washington Post, shared a Pulitzer prize for the paper’s coverage of the Virginia Tech shootings. Last September, he published a 6,200-word profile of Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg in the New Yorker—the result of what he later called his “dream assignment.” By any yardstick of traditional journalism, Vargas had made it.

This morning, the New York Times published Vargas’ confession: he’s an undocumented immigrant, and he’s apparently committed a number of fraud-related crimes in order to obtain the documents he needed to stay in the country and keep working. It’s hard to summarize Vargas’ story—he didn’t even know he was undocumented until, at 16, he applied for a learner’s permit—so you should read the whole thing.

I’m sympathetic to Matt Yglesias’ view that we should empathize with all people who come to the United States in search of a better life, even if, unlike Vargas, they do so knowing that what they’re doing is illegal. But I’ve also worked with foreign-born journalists who’ve paid thousands or tens of thousands of dollars and waded through miles of red tape and seemingly senseless regulations—including, sometimes, returning to their home countries for a period—in order to work in this country.* (This applies outside of journalism, too, of course.) I wonder how they’re feeling about Jose Antonio Vargas this morning.

*UPDATE: As discussed in the comments, these senseless hurdles are a central part of the problem.

DOES IT FEEL LIKE POLITICS IS AT A BREAKING POINT?

Headshot of Editor in Chief of Mother Jones, Clara Jeffery

It sure feels that way to me, and here at Mother Jones, we’ve been thinking a lot about what journalism needs to do differently, and how we can have the biggest impact.

We kept coming back to one word: corruption. Democracy and the rule of law being undermined by those with wealth and power for their own gain. So we're launching an ambitious Mother Jones Corruption Project to do deep, time-intensive reporting on systemic corruption, and asking the MoJo community to help crowdfund it.

We aim to hire, build a team, and give them the time and space needed to understand how we got here and how we might get out. We want to dig into the forces and decisions that have allowed massive conflicts of interest, influence peddling, and win-at-all-costs politics to flourish.

It's unlike anything we've done, and we have seed funding to get started, but we're looking to raise $500,000 from readers by July when we'll be making key budgeting decisions—and the more resources we have by then, the deeper we can dig. If our plan sounds good to you, please help kickstart it with a tax-deductible donation today.

Thanks for reading—whether or not you can pitch in today, or ever, I'm glad you're with us.

Signed by Clara Jeffery

Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our newsletters

Subscribe and we'll send Mother Jones straight to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate

Share your feedback: We’re planning to launch a new version of the comments section. Help us test it.