SCAG Wants to Make Southern California More Urban

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This is mostly Yglesias bait, but the rest of you might be interested too. It’s from a short op-ed about the recent decision of the Southern California Assn. of Governments, or SCAG, to adopt a new Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy:

The plan includes expansion of housing near public transit by 60%….and projections of more than 4 million new jobs — with public transit within half a mile of most of them. Amanda Eaken of the Natural Resources Defense Council praised it as “the strongest transportation plan” in the history of “car-loving Southern California.”

…. SCAG’s new plan is born of the realization that as a region, we have to grow up, not out. That doesn’t mean Hong Kong skyscrapers in Whittier and Redlands. It does mean more apartments near light-rail stations and more vibrant mixed-use areas like the ones in downtown Pasadena, Ventura and Brea. It doesn’t mean wresting the car keys from suburban commuters. It does mean making jobs and housing accessible via foot, bike, bus and rail.

In theory, a plan like this should have almost unanimous support. Developers like it because they can put up denser buildings. Environmentalists like it because it’s more sustainable. Urbanists like it because it creates more walkable communities. City governments like it because it creates a stronger tax base.

There’s really only one constituency that doesn’t like it much: every single person who already lives in these communities and hates the idea of dense, high-rise construction near their homes. So there’s going to be fireworks. It’ll be interesting to see how the NIMBY bloc gets bought off.

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