Walter Carl Preston, 1897-1964

I don’t know Carl Preston. He’s just a name in a cemetery. But I learned a little bit about him.

He was born Walter Carl Preston on December 10th, 1897, in Oklahoma. His mother was named Rose and his father, George, was a farmer. He had one sister, Grace, and five brothers: Ray, Earl, Ralph, Lyle and Robert. He grew up in Oklahoma but dropped out of high school after his sophomore year. When he was 19 he moved to Stockton, where he worked for a cousin as a dairyman. His draft registration says he had blue eyes and brown hair. He drove a truck during World War I.

After the war he settled in Los Angeles. In 1920 he married Catherine Klages and had two children: Kathleen and Richard. He owned a modest home and made his living driving a truck for a street construction company. During the Depression he worked for the WPA for a couple of years, and after that continued driving a truck for the rest of his life. He died on June 5th, 1964. He was a veteran.

DEMOCRACY DOES NOT EXIST...

without free and fair elections, a vigorous free press, and engaged citizens to reclaim power from those who abuse it.

In this election year unlike any other—against a backdrop of a pandemic, an economic crisis, racial reckoning, and so much daily bluster—Mother Jones' journalism is driven by one simple question: Will America move closer to, or further from, justice and equity in the years to come?

If you're able to, please join us in this mission with a donation today. Our reporting right now is focused on voting rights and election security, corruption, disinformation, racial and gender equity, and the climate crisis. We can’t do it without the support of readers like you, and we need to give it everything we've got between now and November. Thank you.

DEMOCRACY DOES NOT EXIST...

without free and fair elections, a vigorous free press, and engaged citizens to reclaim power from those who abuse it.

In this election year unlike any other—against a backdrop of a pandemic, an economic crisis, racial reckoning, and so much daily bluster—Mother Jones' journalism is driven by one simple question: Will America move closer to, or further from, justice and equity in the years to come?

If you're able to, please join us in this mission with a donation today. Our reporting right now is focused on voting rights and election security, corruption, disinformation, racial and gender equity, and the climate crisis. We can’t do it without the support of readers like you, and we need to give it everything we've got between now and November. Thank you.

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate