The World’s Most Arresting Images

21 award-winning pics from the 53rd annual World Press Photo contest.


The annual World Press Photo contest is the preeminent competition for photojournalism, recognizing the best photographs taken worldwide. With the call for entries for the 2011 contest under way, we thought it’d be worth revisiting the 2010 winners.

More than 100,000 images were submitted by 5,847 photographers for the 53rd annual World Press Photo contest. Winners this year included Mother Jones contributors Marco Vernaschi (for his Pulitzer Center work on drug trafficking in Guinea Bissau) and Eugene Richards (for his ongoing series on returning Iraq war veterans, “War Is Personal.”) Italian photographer Pietro Masturzo took the top prize for his haunting photo of Iranian protesters shouting from rooftops during the June uprising in Tehran.

World Press Photo of the Year: Pietro Masturzo, Italy. In Tehran, women shout on rooftops to protest Iran’s presidential election results. Pietro Masturzo, courtesy World Press Photo
 

First prize, Spot News Singles: Adam Ferguson, Australia, The New York Times. Woman rushed from the scene of a suicide bombing in Kabul, Afghanistan. Adam Ferguson/New York Times, courtesy World Press Photo
 

First prize, Spot News Stories: Walter Astrada, Argentina, Agence France-Presse. Bloodbath in Madagascar. Walter Astrada/AFP, courtesy World Press Photo
 

First prize, General News Singles: Kent Klich, Sweden. Gaza photo album: Tuzzah, Gaza Strip. Kent Klich, courtesy World Press Photo
 

First prize, General News Stories: Marco Vernaschi, Italy, Pulitzer Center. Crack cocaine in Guinea Bissau. Marco Vernaschi/Pulitzer Center, courtesy World Press Photo
 

Second prize, People in the News Singles: David Guttenfelder, USA, The Associated Press. US soldiers respond to Taliban fire outside their bunker in Korengal Valley, Afghanistan. David Guttenfelder/AP, courtesy World Press Photo
 

First prize, People in the News Stories: Charles Ommanney, UK, Getty Images for Newsweek. Inauguration Day, Washington DC. Charles Ommanney/Getty Images/Newsweek, courtesy World Press Photo
 

First prize, Sports Action Singles: Gareth Copley, UK, Press Association. England’s Jonathan Trott is run out at the fifth Ashes test match in London. Gareth Copley/Press Association, courtesy World Press Photo
 

First prize, Sports Action Stories: Donald Miralle Jr., USA. Ironman World Championships, Hawaii. Donald Miralle Jr., courtesy World Press Photo
 

First prize, Sports Features Singles: Robert Gauthier, USA, Los Angeles Times Magazine. Yankee fans try to distract Angels left fielder Juan Rivera at Yankee Stadium. Robert Gauthier, Los Angeles Times Magazine, courtesy World Press Photo
 

First prize, Sports Features Stories: Elizabeth Kreutz, USA. Lance Armstrong’s comeback. Elizabeth Kreutz, courtesy World Press Photo
 

Second prize, Contemporary Issues Singles: Stefano De Luigi, Italy, VII Network for Le Monde Magazine. Giraffe killed by drought in northeastern Kenya. Stefano De Luigi/VII Network/Le Monde Magazine, courtesy World Press Photo
 

First prize, Contemporary Issues Stories: Eugene Richards, USA, Reportage by Getty Images for The Sunday Times Magazine/Paris Match. From “War Is Personal,” USA. Eugene Richards/Reportage by Getty/Sunday Times Magazine/Paris Match, courtesy World Press Photo
 

Second prize, Daily Life Singles: Joan Bardeletti, France, Picturetank. The middle class in Mozambique: Sunday picnic on an African beach. Joan Bardeletti/Picturetank, courtesy World Press Photo
 

First prize, Daily Life Stories: Gihan Tubbeh, Peru. Adrian, 13-year old autist. Gihan Tubbeh, courtesy World Press Photo
 

First prize, Portraits Singles: Laura Pannack, UK, Lisa Pritchard Agency for The Guardian Weekend magazine. Graham, anorexic teenager. Laura Pannack/Lisa Pritchard Agency/Guardian Weekend Magazine, courtesy World Press Photo
 

Second prize, Portraits Stories: Annie van Gemert, the Netherlands Annie van Gemert, courtesy World Press Photo
 

First prize, Arts and Entertainment Singles: Malick Sidibé, Mali, for The New York Times Magazine Fashion Portfolio. Prints and the revolution, Mali. Malick Sidibé/New York Times Magazine, courtesy World Press Photo
 

First prize, Arts and Entertainment Stories: Kitra Cahana, Canada, Fabrica for Colors magazine. Rainbowland, New Mexico. Kitra Cahana/Colours, courtesy World Press Photo
 

First prize, Nature Singles: Joe Petersburger, Hungary, National Geographic. A hunting kingfisher in Hungary. Joe Petersburger/National Geographic, courtesy World Press Photo
 

First prize, Nature Stories: Paul Nicklen, Canada, National Geographic. South Georgia, Antarctica. Paul Nicklen/National Geographic, courtesy World Press Photo

 

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Thank you!

We didn't know what to expect when we told you we needed to raise $400,000 before our fiscal year closed on June 30, and we're thrilled to report that our incredible community of readers contributed some $415,000 to help us keep charging as hard as we can during this crazy year.

You just sent an incredible message: that quality journalism doesn't have to answer to advertisers, billionaires, or hedge funds; that newsrooms can eke out an existence thanks primarily to the generosity of its readers. That's so powerful. Especially during what's been called a "media extinction event" when those looking to make a profit from the news pull back, the Mother Jones community steps in.

The months and years ahead won't be easy. Far from it. But there's no one we'd rather face the big challenges with than you, our committed and passionate readers, and our team of fearless reporters who show up every day.

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