“There were 15 of my family in our house, and now many of them are dead.”


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Dahr Jamail has filed a new dispatch from Lebanon. Over the weekend he visited a number of hospitals in the south and interviewed civilian victims of the fighting. He writes:

Returning from traveling to Sidon on Saturday, I was emotionally exhausted, physically sick from what I saw.

The first hospital I visited with two photographer friends was the largest in the south, Hamoudi Hospital. After asking permission, we were taken to several rooms of patients there.

In the first room, I met 77 year-old Mousa Sif, an old man who sat on the end of his bed, his eyes expressing a mixture of shock, fatigue, grief and sadness. “The second day of the war the Israelis bombed my home,” he told me.

He, his family and several neighbors had gone to the UN building nearby their home, seeking shelter, but the UN people sent them back to their home.

“We were bombed by the Israelis during our trip to the UN, then on our way back home, several of the vehicles were hit,” he told me wearily, “Then they bombed our home. There were 15 of my family in our house, and now many of them are dead.”

Read the rest here.

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