A Big Day Calls for a Big Lie


Yesterday, in an attempt to rally the conservative base before the midterms, Bush’s press secretary Tony Snow had a sitdown with Rush Limbaugh. Snow urged listeners to take the media’s portrayal of gloom and doom in Iraq with a grain of salt, saying: “The war is more popular in Iraq than it is in the United States because the Iraqis actually get to see the Americans in action.”

Now, no one expects Limbaugh to keep a close tally of the facts, but sitting in a recording studio shouldn’t give his guests, especially those from the White House, carte blanche to mangle the truth. Considering that Iraq couldn’t be much less popular stateside (“most polls show that only a third of Americans approve of the President’s handling of the situation), Snow’s remark is akin to Bush pointing at Robert Mugabe and saying, “hey my approval ratings are higher than that guy’s.”

Even using a low threshold of popularity as a basis for comparison, sentiment in Iraq towards U.S. forces hardly seems convivial. To put it in perspective, a recent poll done by Maryland’s Program on International Policy Attitudes, found that six in ten Iraqis approve of attacks on U.S.-led forces. Moreover, it found that 78 percent of Iraqis think “the U.S. presence provokes more violence than it prevents.” These findings are confirmed by the State Department’s own poll that found two-thirds of Iraqis in Baghdad favor an immediate withdrawal of U.S. troops. The dismal situation in Iraq can be described as many things, but “popular” probably isn’t one of them. In any case, it’s safe to say that the White House’s version of truth always comes with a not-so-small margin of error.

—Koshlan Mayer-Blackwell

DOES IT FEEL LIKE POLITICS IS AT A BREAKING POINT?

Headshot of Editor in Chief of Mother Jones, Clara Jeffery

It sure feels that way to me, and here at Mother Jones, we’ve been thinking a lot about what journalism needs to do differently, and how we can have the biggest impact.

We kept coming back to one word: corruption. Democracy and the rule of law being undermined by those with wealth and power for their own gain. So we're launching an ambitious Mother Jones Corruption Project to do deep, time-intensive reporting on systemic corruption, and asking the MoJo community to help crowdfund it.

We aim to hire, build a team, and give them the time and space needed to understand how we got here and how we might get out. We want to dig into the forces and decisions that have allowed massive conflicts of interest, influence peddling, and win-at-all-costs politics to flourish.

It's unlike anything we've done, and we have seed funding to get started, but we're looking to raise $500,000 from readers by July when we'll be making key budgeting decisions—and the more resources we have by then, the deeper we can dig. If our plan sounds good to you, please help kickstart it with a tax-deductible donation today.

Thanks for reading—whether or not you can pitch in today, or ever, I'm glad you're with us.

Signed by Clara Jeffery

Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our newsletters

Subscribe and we'll send Mother Jones straight to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate

Share your feedback: We’re planning to launch a new version of the comments section. Help us test it.