Clinics Want To Know How Bill O’Reilly Got Confidential Patient Records


Two clinics in Topeka, Kansas have asked the Kansas Supreme Court to investigate Kansas Attorney General Phil Kline and Fox Broadcasting’s Bill O’Reilly over O’Reilly’s claim that he possessed information from the records of patients who underwent abortion procedures.

Kline, a vocal opponent of abortion, took possession of ninety medical records from the two clinics earlier this year “as part of his investigation into alleged cases of child rape, failure to report child rape and violations of state’s late-term abortion statue.” According to Kline’s website:

Those medical records are being reviewed by criminal prosecutors and investigators in my office. I want to remind Kansans that women and children are not and never will be under investigation – only abortion doctors, confirming doctors, and rapists are under investigation. Also, I have never sought the women’s identities. I do not need their identities. Their privacy is protected by a protocol my office established with the district court judge to removing the identifying information of the women from the very beginning.

O’Reilly maintains that an “inside source” gave him the information from the Topeka records. He cited the case of a doctor who performed late-term abortions “because patients were depressed,” and referred to the procedure as “executing babies.”

Last week, Kansas’s former attorney general, Bob Stephan, asked the Kansas Governmental Ethics Commission to investigate Kline’s fundraising activities.

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