George Bush Proven Wrong on His Own Place in History, Gets Agitated


As President Bush winds down his presidential term, folks are talking about his legacy and his place in history. Bush seems to think that history will validate his actions in Iraq. His lack of popularity, he believes, will be ignored by historians who are more interested in the impact his ideas will have worldwide.

That’s the point Bush tried to make to congressional members is his going away meeting with the 109th. But the events of that meeting illustrate why Bush is hopelessly misled, and will likely be relegated to the junk heap of history. What do you think history will view George as, a visionary or a stubborn, simple-minded buffon? Judge for yourself.

Bush began his talk by comparing himself to President Harry S Truman, who launched the Truman Doctrine to fight communism, got bogged down in the Korean War and left office unpopular.

Bush said that “in years to come they realized he was right and then his doctrine became the standard for America,” recalled Senate Majority Whip-elect Richard Durbin, D-Ill. “He’s trying to position himself in history and to justify those who continue to stand by him, saying sometimes if you’re right you’re unpopular, and be prepared for criticism.”

Durbin said he challenged Bush’s analogy, reminding him that Truman had the NATO alliance behind him and negotiated with his enemies at the United Nations. Durbin said that’s what the Iraq Study Group is recommending that Bush do now – work more with allies and negotiate with adversaries on Iraq.

Bush, Durbin said, “reacted very strongly. He got very animated in his response” and emphasized that he is “the commander in chief.”

Hahahaha. Love it. H/T Political Animal.

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