Hollywood B Team in D.C.

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In the past week, Hollywood celebs have been spotted in Washington, D.C. discussing politics, the state of broadcast television, and the American constitution. No, they are not scientologists, but a group called the Creative Coalition, in town to meet with Congress to address issues of importance to the “creative community.”

Members include Alan Cumming, Heather Graham, Wendie Malick (remember the show “Just Shoot Me”?), and Joe Pantoliano of “The Sopranos” (currently serving as co-president). The group’s main advocacy issues are the protection of First Amendment rights, funding and support for arts in education, and the prevention of “runaway productions,” films made for cheaper outside of the United States.

Free speech and arts in schools are integral to building a strong culture, no doubt about it. But there is something about this coalition that reeks of that special designer brand of misplaced concern so easy to associate with Hollywood stars.

This on the First Amendment from their website:

In the wake of the Janet Jackson Super Bowl ‘wardrobe malfunction,’ Congress has been considering the Broadcast Decency Enforcement Act of 2004 […] We believe the bill has potentially dangerous impacts on free speech—particularly for individuals.

And just when you thought you would never see the words “wardrobe malfunction” in any serious context again. What about those “runaway productions”? If they were to prevent this getaway film making, I expect that many movie stars would revolt. This would mean missing out on parking their trailers at faraway beach paradises or enjoying the reputed free-love atmosphere of Vancouver, a.k.a. Hollywood North.

–Caroline Dobuzinskis

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As we wrote over the summer, traffic has been down at Mother Jones and a lot of sites with many people thinking news is less important now that Donald Trump is no longer president. But if you're reading this, you're not one of those people, and we're hoping we can rally support from folks like you who really get why our reporting matters right now. And that's how it's always worked: For 45 years now, a relatively small group of readers (compared to everyone we reach) who pitch in from time to time has allowed Mother Jones to do the type of journalism the moment demands and keep it free for everyone else.

Please pitch in with a donation during our fall fundraising drive if you can. We can't afford to come up short, and there's still a long way to go by November 5.

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