Rove and Co. Broke Federal Law With Email Scam

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Our friends at CREW are back in the news. They’ve put out a report saying “the Executive Office of the President (EOP) has lost over FIVE MILLION emails generated between March 2003 and October 2005.” The White House was apparently given a plan to recover those emails, but has chosen to do nothing. I’m going to go ahead and guess that the plan to uncover those emails will never be undertaken unless done so with the power of a federal subpoena, because those emails were meant to be lost.

But guess what? Turns out, this is all illegal! Dan Froomkin of the Washington Post asked a White House spokesman to read aloud the White House’s policy on email retention, and this is what he said:

“Federal law requires the preservation of electronic communications sent or received by White House staff… The official EOP e-mail system is designed to automatically comply with records management requirements.”

Federal law? Holy cow! Deleting your emails is a federal offense, and the official email system is designed so emails will never be “accidentally” deleted. These guys are totally on the hook, right? Wait, there’s more?

“Personnel working on behalf of the EOP [Executive Office of the President] are expected to only use government-provided e-mail services for all official communication.”

So using email addresses belonging to the RNC and laptops and Blackberries on loan from the same is a violation of policy?

Bring in Patrick Fitzgerald now! Everyone is going to prison!

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Thank you!

We didn't know what to expect when we told you we needed to raise $400,000 before our fiscal year closed on June 30, and we're thrilled to report that our incredible community of readers contributed some $415,000 to help us keep charging as hard as we can during this crazy year.

You just sent an incredible message: that quality journalism doesn't have to answer to advertisers, billionaires, or hedge funds; that newsrooms can eke out an existence thanks primarily to the generosity of its readers. That's so powerful. Especially during what's been called a "media extinction event" when those looking to make a profit from the news pull back, the Mother Jones community steps in.

The months and years ahead won't be easy. Far from it. But there's no one we'd rather face the big challenges with than you, our committed and passionate readers, and our team of fearless reporters who show up every day.

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