Exit Polls From Louisiana

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Unlike Nebraska and Washington, Louisiana has some exit polls. Here’s what they say on the Democratic side:

Women were a huge percentage of the vote today — 57 percent. Yet, women went for Obama, 54 percent to 45 percent. Obama won every age group except the over-60s, and he did so by very substantial margins.

Folks who make less than $50,000/year went for Obama 54-44. Folks who make more than $50,000/year went for Obama 55-44. There is a saying I’ve heard that suggests Clinton has “50-50 voters”: if you are over 50 years old or you make less than $50,000/year, you’ll vote for Clinton. In Louisiana, at least, that’s half wrong.

White voters (50 percent of the electorate) went for Clinton 69 percent to 28 percent. Black voters (44 percent of the electorate) went for Obama 86 percent to 14 percent. That’s a pretty stark racial divide. Funny enough, though, 77 percent of voters said that race was “not important” when they decide whom to vote for.

Almost half of voters say the economy is the most important issue. Roughly 30 percent said Iraq, and just over 20 percent said health care. These numbers are not matched on the Republican side. There, 33 percent said they prioritize the economy, 21 percent said illegal immigration, 21 percent said terrorism, and 20 percent said Iraq. That would imply that national security issues top the economy as the most important issue. Defying conventional wisdom, however, terrorism voters went for Huckabee while Iraq voters went for McCain. Maybe some folks think a President Huckabee could convince God to stop terrorist missiles in mid air.

Speaking of the Republicans, there’s a divide in their party, too. Evangelical voters in Louisiana (56 percent of the electorate tonight) went 58-28 for Huckabee. Non-evangelical voters (44 percent of the electorate) were exactly the opposite, 58-28 for McCain. Oh, and here’s another clear dividing line: moderates and folks calling themselves “somewhat conservative” went for McCain. Folks calling themselves “very conservative” went for Huckabee. This McCain fellow has got some work ahead of him.

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