ACLU Releases New Detainee Docs


The ACLU got its hands on a bunch of previously withheld documents from the State Department, DoJ, and military officials regarding the treatment of detainees. Of note are a summary (.pdf) of investigations into four detainee deaths (including one where an interrogator bashed in a detainee’s head with a stove) and a detailed memorandum (.pdf) from Brittain Mallow, the head of Gitmo’s Criminal Investigation Task Force, that spells out in minute detail exactly which interrogation techniques are legal—something the Bush Administration has generally found itself unable to do. According to Mallow, acceptable methods include prolonged interviews, interrupted sleep (as opposed to deprivation), deception, incentives, and props (think photos, not stoves). Unacceptable methods include threats, promises that cannot be kept, unnecessary discomfort, and sensory deprivation.

There’s still some gray area—although the prohibition on “discomfort” includes “any form of physical contact designed to cause physical discomfort,” it’s not clear whether it extends to physical abuse. Nonetheless, Mallow’s specificity is a welcome respite from the legal bobbing and weaving we’ve come to expect from administration lackeys.

(h/t Glenn Greenwald)

—Casey Miner

Fact:

Mother Jones was founded as a nonprofit in 1976 because we knew corporations and the wealthy wouldn’t fund the type of hard-hitting journalism we set out to do.

Today, reader support makes up about two-thirds of our budget, allows us to dig deep on stories that matter, and lets us keep our reporting free for everyone. If you value what you get from Mother Jones, please join us with a tax-deductible donation so we can keep on doing the type of journalism that 2018 demands.

Donate Now