Palin’s First Year as Mayor: Off With Their Heads!


The Seattle Times has unearthed three boxes of archived documents on Palin’s first year as the mayor of Wasilla. The year is 1996, and Palin can’t seem to decide whether she wants to be Karl Rove or the Queen of Hearts. Elections in this town of 5,000 are officially nonpartisan, but Palin and her supporters turn the race into a senseless proxy war for national issues: they tar her opponent as “pro-abortion” and question his marital status, trumpet her endorsement by the NRA, and roll out the slogan, “Conservative, More Efficient Government.” Her backers include an only-in-Alaska coalition of the religious right and bar owners who want to make sure they can keep serving until 5 a.m.

After she’s elected, she gets drunk on power and goes on a firing binge. We already knew she pink slipped the anti-book-banning librarian, but here we learn more: she fires the police chief, who’d recently been named Wasilla’s employee of the year, and, in a sort of Lord of the Flies scenario, asks the three employees of the town museum to decide among themselves who will get the ax (all three decide to quit). The same year, she’s stopped by the city attorney after she tries to stack the city council. The local paper, the Frontiersman, condemns her in blistering editorials and citizens talk of a recall.

Despite all of this, of course, she’s reelected in 1999. She’s a smoother politician by then. But given the way she later wields the axe as governor (see Troopergate), maybe the editors of the Frontiersman were onto something when they wrote that Palin’s philosophy was “that either we are with her or against her.” Sounds a lot like king what’s-his-name

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