How to Do Congressional Oversight


The Project on Government Oversight (POGO) recently published a new handbook outlining “best practices” for congressional oversight of government. It’s available free to members of Congress and their staff members. If you are not a denizen of the Hill, you can buy it online.

I’ll give you the bottom line for free: don’t assume that everyone else knows what you know or is asking the questions you’re asking. Wondering why something isn’t being investigated? Bother your Congresscritter. Have a whistle to blow? Bother your Congresscritter. Better yet, let us know: a lot of the time, media attention can get the ball rolling when it wasn’t before. Try scoop [at] motherjones [dot] com. We’re listening.

WE DON'T KNOW

What's going to happen next as the headlines grow crazier and more disconcerting by the day. But we do know the job of an independent, unrelenting press is more important than ever—and the ongoing commitment of MoJo readers to fight for a democracy where facts matter and all can participate is absolutely vital.

If you feel the urgency deep in your bones like we do, please consider signing up as a monthly donor during our fall pledge drive to support Mother Jones' fair and fearless reporting for the long haul (or make a one-time gift if that works better for you). The headlines may fade, but the need to investigate the powerful never will.