Cute Animal in Danger: Cuscus

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The cuscus is a marsupial native to Australia and New Guinea. This nocturnal tree-dweller has opposable toes and fingers like a monkey which help it keep hold of slippery branches. It can also use its long, prehensile tail to keep its balance. The cuscus is actually a member of the opossum family and ranges in length from about one to two feet (with the tail an additional two feet long) and weighing in around 10 lbs. The bottom of their tales are furless, rough and scaly so as to have a better grip. Cuscuses generally eat fruits and leaves, but will snack on eggs and small mammals if it can get them. Though, since the cuscus’s low metabolism and body temperature, they’re slow like a sloth and rarely catch other animals. The cuscus’s main predators are pythons and birds of prey; because cuscuses are largely arboreal, ground-dwelling predators are generally not a problem. Other than man, of course, which sometimes hunts and eats them.

There are a few different kinds of cuscuses. The spotted (pictured above) and gray varieties are not endangered, but the large, splashy-coated black-spotted cuscus is battling poachers for survival. It lives mostly in New Guinean rainforests and is suffering devastating habitat loss from logging and agriculture; it’s also been hunted extensively both for its meat and distinctive, woolly coat. It’s now considered “critically endangered” and due to its remote habitat, it’s not even certain how many of the animals still exist today. Only 18 specimens have ever been collected. As one book said, its “outlook” seems increasingly “bleak.”

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SIX TRUTHS

Reclaiming power from those who abuse it often starts with telling the truth. And in "This Is How Authoritarians Get Defeated," MoJo's Monika Bauerlein unpacks six truths to remember during the homestretch of an election where democracy, truth, and decency are on the line.

Truth #1: The chaos is the point.

Truth #2: Team Reality is bigger than it seems.

Truth #3: Facebook owns this.

Truth #4: When we go to work, we're in the fight.

Truth #5: It's about minority rule.

Truth #6: The only thing that can save us is…us.

Please take a moment to see how all these truths add up, because what happens in the weeks and months ahead will reverberate for at least a generation and we better be prepared.

And if you think journalism like Mother Jones'—that calls it like it is, that will never acquiesce to power, that looks where others don't—can help guide us through this historic, high-stakes moment, and you're able to right now, please help us reach our $350,000 goal by October 31 with a donation today. It's all hands on deck for democracy.

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