Afghan Minister: “Zero Tolerance” for Security Firm Shootings

Flickr/<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/dvids/">DVIDSHUB</a> (<a href="http://www.creativecommons.org">Creative Commons</a>).


Shortly before departing Kabul to accompany President Hamid Karzai on a state visit to Washington, Interior Minister Haneef Atmar delivered a message to the country’s myriad private security operations: You can’t get away with murder. Anymore, at least.

Following recent incidents in which two civilians were gunned down, Atmar banned a pair of security companies—Compass and Watan Risk Management—from providing their services on the Kabul-to-Kandahar highway, where the shootings occurred. Additionally, the alleged perpetrators were arrested and are facing prosecution.

In the past, undisciplined and reckless guards, many of them locals drawn from the ranks of militias or moonlighting members of the national police force, have been known to fire wildly and indiscriminately, sometimes wounding or killing civilians; Compass guards were previously blamed for the death of a Canadian soldier. But, when these episodes occur, there has often been little in the way of consequences. As a result, outrage has mounted among Afghans who believe the country’s many security firms—some of them glorified militias—operate with impunity. Military officials have expressed concern about the irresponsible actions of security contractors as well, since their conduct directly undermines the principles of counterinsurgency, which calls for protecting the populace even at the expense of protecting the troops.

According to Atmar, times are changing. “The level of tolerance of misconduct when it comes to these organizations is zero,” he told me on Thursday, at a State Department event attended by a handful of Afghan cabinet members. “They have had all the time to develop their capacities to professionally provide a service. Now if they fail to do that very, very serious legal action will be taken.”

By suspending Compass and Watan Risk Management, Atmar is taking on two of Afghanistan’s biggest—and one of its most politically connected—firms. Watan is run by Ahmad and Rashid Popal, relatives of the Afghan president. It is one of a group of companies—including a lucrative trucking operation run by the Georgetown-educated son of Afghanistan’s defense minister—currently under investigation by a congressional subcommittee probing allegations of payoffs to the Taliban and local powerbrokers in exchange for the safe passage of convoys on dangerous stretches of road.

Just how far is Atmar willing to take his zero tolerance policy? While he may have temporarily sidelined Compass and Watan from running the Kabul-to-Kandahar highway, he suggested that he’ll “most likely be amenable to allow them to work” once a few “basic conditions” are met. Among other things, he’s seeking compensation for the families of the victims and “guarantees that this will not happen again.” And if it does? Perhaps that will be the real test of Atmar’s crackdown.

DOES IT FEEL LIKE POLITICS IS AT A BREAKING POINT?

Headshot of Editor in Chief of Mother Jones, Clara Jeffery

It sure feels that way to me, and here at Mother Jones, we’ve been thinking a lot about what journalism needs to do differently, and how we can have the biggest impact.

We kept coming back to one word: corruption. Democracy and the rule of law being undermined by those with wealth and power for their own gain. So we're launching an ambitious Mother Jones Corruption Project to do deep, time-intensive reporting on systemic corruption, and asking the MoJo community to help crowdfund it.

We aim to hire, build a team, and give them the time and space needed to understand how we got here and how we might get out. We want to dig into the forces and decisions that have allowed massive conflicts of interest, influence peddling, and win-at-all-costs politics to flourish.

It's unlike anything we've done, and we have seed funding to get started, but we're looking to raise $500,000 from readers by July when we'll be making key budgeting decisions—and the more resources we have by then, the deeper we can dig. If our plan sounds good to you, please help kickstart it with a tax-deductible donation today.

Thanks for reading—whether or not you can pitch in today, or ever, I'm glad you're with us.

Signed by Clara Jeffery

Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our newsletters

Subscribe and we'll send Mother Jones straight to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate

Share your feedback: We’re planning to launch a new version of the comments section. Help us test it.