Chipping Away at Abortion Access

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Some anti-abortion activists contend that the new class of laws targeting abortion providers with onerous regulations are merely an effort to protect women from “unsafe” clinics. They argue that laws like the one enacted recently in Kansas aren’t intended to end abortion. But now that one of the three clinics in Kansas looks likely to survive the new regulations, anti-abortion activists in the state are bemoaning the fact that the current law doesn’t go far enough.

The Planned Parenthood clinic in Overland Park, Kansas expects to be granted a license to continue operating, despite the stricter new laws imposed on a tight time frame. And Personhood Kansas is none too pleased that their backdoor ban failed to succeed in ending safe, legal abortion in the state. From their press release Monday:

“The legislature has passed every abortion regulation imaginable. No baby is safe from the grasp of the abortionists until the personhood of every human being is affirmed by law,” explained Committee Chairman, Bruce Garren.

Anti-abortion groups and lawmakers have been busy this year advancing laws that seek to make it difficult, if not impossible, for women to have an abortion. This type of legislation is no exception—it’s just another measure they’re using to chip away access to a federally affirmed right.

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THE BIG PICTURE

You expect the big picture, and it's our job at Mother Jones to give it to you. And right now, so many of the troubles we face are the making not of a virus, but of the quest for profit, political or economic (and not just from the man in the White House who could have offered leadership and comfort but instead gave us bleach).

In "News Is Just Like Waste Management," we unpack what the coronavirus crisis has meant for journalism, including Mother Jones’, and how we can rise to the challenge. If you're able to, this is a critical moment to support our nonprofit journalism with a donation: We've scoured our budget and made the cuts we can without impairing our mission, and we hope to raise $400,000 from our community of online readers to help keep our big reporting projects going because this extraordinary pandemic-plus-election year is no time to pull back.

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