Charlie Crist’s Wife Receives Sleazy Robocall

Florida governor Charlie Crist and his wife, Carole. Chris Zuppa/Tampa Bay Times/ZUMA Press


I just ran into former Florida Gov. Charlie Crist, the former Republican who has endorsed President Barack Obama, and his wife Carole, while they were strolling through the Obama campaign event in Chicago. “What’s going to happen in your state?” I asked him.

It’s close, he said. It’s possible Obama can win. Yes, I replied, but if it’s close, shenanigans can come into play.

“Yes, yes,” Crist said. “Listen to what happened to my wife.” He then nudged me in her direction. “Tell him,” he said to her.

It was a phone call, she said. A robocall. it came at 8:15 this morning. Usually, she hangs up on such calls. But this one she listened to. It went something like this: “I’m calling from the supervisor of elections for Pinellas County to remind you that Election Day is tomorrow and you can vote until 7:00 pm.” Tomorrow.

“If you woke up and heard about long lines and heard a call like this,” she told me, “You might think you can wait until tomorrow. How many thousands of calls like this went out? And who made them? I don’t know.” (She was indeed one of thousands in the county who received the same misleading call.)

Well, I said, let’s hope Florida is not another mess. “Yes,” she said. “Let’s.”

One More Thing

And it's a big one. Mother Jones is launching a new Corruption Project to do deep, time-intensive reporting on the corruption that is both the cause and result of the crisis in our democracy.

The more we thought about how Mother Jones can have the most impact right now, the more we realized that so many stories come down to corruption: People with wealth and power putting their interests first—and often getting away with it.

Our goal is to understand how we got here and how we might get out. We're aiming to create a reporting position dedicated to uncovering corruption, build a team, and let them investigate for a year—publishing our stories in a concerted window: a special issue of our magazine, video and podcast series, and a dedicated online portal so they don't get lost in the daily deluge of headlines and breaking news.

We want to go all in, and we've got seed funding to get started—but we're looking to raise $500,000 in donations this spring so we can go even bigger. You can read about why we think this project is what the moment demands and what we hope to accomplish—and if you like how it sounds, please help us go big with a tax-deductible donation today.

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our newsletters

Subscribe and we'll send Mother Jones straight to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate