VIDEO: Hiking the 1,700-Mile Keystone Pipeline “Trail”


“I live a pretty unconventional life,” Ken Ilgunas tells me, speaking over Skype from a community library in Marion, Kansas. It’s a typical understatement for Ilgunas, who has the kind of ultra-low-key demeanor one acquires after many nights in the backcountry by oneself. In September, after a year of minimalist living in his van, Ilgunas, 29, was on the hunt for a new adventure. He’d been following the controversy over the Keystone XL pipeline, heard stories of the landscapes it could jeopardize, and decided the best thing to do would be to go see the thing first-hand. So in September, he found a State Department map, strapped on a pair of good hiking boots, hitchhiked to Canada, and started walking the 1,700-mile route the pipe, if built, will take from the tar sands to ports in the Gulf of Mexico. He expects to finish his journey mid-February; along the way he’s encountered frigid cold, charging moose, cows (lots of cows), and plenty of folks who want to keep the pipe out of their backyards.

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  • Tim McDonnell is a journalist who previously worked for Mother Jones. He covers the environment, conflict, and related issues in the United States, sub-Saharan Africa, and elsewhere.