Here’s the House GOP’s Final Debt Ceiling Offer (Update: Or Not)

Sen. David Vitter (R-La.)<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/derek_b/3934704055/sizes/l/in/photolist-6ZGor6-6ZLqpE-6ZLmWm-6ZLpA9-bwZL4x-bwZL9a-g232x5-7SP6p4-bwXcpe-d6mQJN-6Pzb3V-cVGnA-9SL1JX-cmhGES-cmhFEY-cmhG9y-cmhFho-cmhGS9-cmhH65-cmhFVY-cmhGrQ-cmhGhL-8FJSTF-8FN4aA-8FJTxH-8FJRrK-dc4YJi-5AV3sU-a1xCEA-a1uKQi-a1uKLk-cE7Kzq-4BcC7/">Derek Bridges</a>/Flickr

Update: Heritage Action, the political action arm of the right’s top think tank and a leader in the anti-Obamacare crusade, is urging members to vote against House Speaker John Boehner’s latest proposal to end the shutdown and debt ceiling crisis. After the tea partyish organization declared its opposition, the House Rules Committee postponed a Tuesday night hearing on the bill, an indication Boehner’s plan might be dead even before arrival within his own caucus. So…buy gold.

Update II: It’s official: No vote on Tuesday.

On Tuesday afternoon Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-Ohio) unveiled his final offer to end the shutdown and stave off a catastrophic federal default. The GOP’s proposal would fund the federal government through December 15 (setting up a possible Christmas shutdown; hooray!), raise the debt ceiling through February 7, and incorporate what’s known as the “Vitter amendment”—language prohibiting congressional staffers from receiving subsidies for the purchase of health insurance. It would also prohibit the Secretary of the Treasury from taking “extraordinary measures” to prevent the default—which some Republicans have previously suggested might help stave off the crisis—due to fears among GOP congressmen that Secretary Jack Lew was using his powers to fudge the deadline.

Not included in the bill are several provisions that had been discussed previously, such as a “conscience clause” to exempt employers from having to include birth control as part of their insurance plans, and a delay of repeal of the Affordable Care Act’s tax on medical device manufacturers—a proposal supported by donors but rejected by some conservative members. Boehner is set to bring the bill to a vote Tuesday night, leaving it up to the Senate, where Democrats have previously opposed all efforts to include the Vitter amendment in impasse-ending legislation. Some House Republicans had considered ditching town after the vote, in the hopes of forcing the point.

We’ll keep you updated. In the meantime, you can read the bill:

 

DOES IT FEEL LIKE POLITICS IS AT A BREAKING POINT?

Headshot of Editor in Chief of Mother Jones, Clara Jeffery

It sure feels that way to me, and here at Mother Jones, we’ve been thinking a lot about what journalism needs to do differently, and how we can have the biggest impact.

We kept coming back to one word: corruption. Democracy and the rule of law being undermined by those with wealth and power for their own gain. So we're launching an ambitious Mother Jones Corruption Project to do deep, time-intensive reporting on systemic corruption, and asking the MoJo community to help crowdfund it.

We aim to hire, build a team, and give them the time and space needed to understand how we got here and how we might get out. We want to dig into the forces and decisions that have allowed massive conflicts of interest, influence peddling, and win-at-all-costs politics to flourish.

It's unlike anything we've done, and we have seed funding to get started, but we're looking to raise $500,000 from readers by July when we'll be making key budgeting decisions—and the more resources we have by then, the deeper we can dig. If our plan sounds good to you, please help kickstart it with a tax-deductible donation today.

Thanks for reading—whether or not you can pitch in today, or ever, I'm glad you're with us.

Signed by Clara Jeffery

Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our newsletters

Subscribe and we'll send Mother Jones straight to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate

Share your feedback: We’re planning to launch a new version of the comments section. Help us test it.