Read the Connecticut State’s Attorney’s Crime Report on the Sandy Hook Massacre

The document offers insight into the history of the gunman and a timeline of the police response to the school.


Today Connecticut State’s Attorney Stephen J. Sedensky III released a report on the criminal investigation of the December 14, 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting that left 20 children and six adults dead. The long-awaited document is only a summary of the yet-to-be released final crime report, which is estimated to run thousands of pages, according to the Hartford Courant.

The summary report includes a timeline of the police response to Sandy Hook, starting with the first 911 call. It also offers some insight into the family history, interests, and mental health of shooter Adam Lanza. Included is an inventory of violent video games he owned, along with a record of some of the evidence recovered from Lanza’s hard drive, such as images of him brandishing weapons, movies depicting mass shootings, and videos of people committing suicide by gunshot.

Sedensky has been criticized for delaying the publication of the report and withholding 911 recordings, which are routinely released to the public. He is currently appealing a ruling by the state’s Freedom of Information Commission stating he must release the emergency calls. A judge is expected to listen to the tapes and make a ruling in the near future. With today’s release of the crime report, the investigation into the massacre is officially closed.

We’ll be combing through the report and highlighting important revelations here. Check back for updates.

 

Click here to download the report.

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You just sent an incredible message: that quality journalism doesn't have to answer to advertisers, billionaires, or hedge funds; that newsrooms can eke out an existence thanks primarily to the generosity of its readers. That's so powerful. Especially during what's been called a "media extinction event" when those looking to make a profit from the news pull back, the Mother Jones community steps in.

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