Are Your Kids’ Rainbow Bracelets Toxic?

<a href="http://www.shutterstock.com/pic-172154666/stock-photo-loom-bracelets-on-a-young-girl-s-hand-close-up-young-fashion-concept.html?src=4EAXA7L32ENeL5zgvbQAYw-1-2" target="_blank">mervas</a>/Shutterstock


Bracelets and other trinkets made on the wildly popular Rainbow Loom—a toy that allows kids to weave together brightly colored elastic bands—could contain cancer-causing chemicals, a British laboratory has found.

In a study commissioned by a British toy retailer, the Assay Laboratory in Birmingham, United Kingdom, tested charms meant to be attached to bracelets and necklaces woven on the looms. The researchers found that while Rainbow Loom’s own name-brand products were safe, some charms made by knockoff brands contained high levels of phthalates, a class of carcinogenic chemicals. Some of the knockoff charms were composed of as much as 50 percent (by weight) phthalates, the Irish blog Mummy Pages reports. (It’s currently illegal in the United States to sell a toy that contains more than 0.1 percent of six kinds of phthalates, though some products still slip through the cracks.)

Marion Wilson, a spokeswoman from the lab, told Mummy Pages that while only the charms were tested, it was likely that the bands themselves also contained phthalates. In an email to Mother Jones, Wilson declined to share the names of the brands that were found to have high phthalate levels. “We would never share our customer information as it is clearly commercially sensitive,” she wrote. “However, please note that the customers that have received test results like this will have tested the product prior to it going on the market.” It’s unclear whether the brands tested at the lab are sold in the United States as well as in the United Kingdom.

Phthalates aren’t the only dangerous thing about Rainbow Looms: BuzzFeed notes other horrors, including injuries to children. Animal advocates in the Philippines say that the bands can harm creatures that swallow them.

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