The Walmart Heirs Give a Measly Amount to Charity

Jim, Alice, and Rob Walton at 2012 Walmart shareholders' meetingAP Photo/April L. Brown


The Walmart heirs are infamous for their wealth and penny-pinching. Christy, Jim, Alice, and Rob Walton wouldn’t be the sixth-, seventh-, eighth-, and ninth-richest Americans, respectively, if not for Walmart’s relentless exploitation of its low-wage workers. But the Waltons’ stinginess also extends to their philanthropy. According to a new analysis by the union-backed Making Change at Walmart campaign, the Walton scions give way less money to charity than other über-rich Americans. In fact, the six other richest Americans have each donated many times more money to philanthropic causes than all four Walton heirs combined:

Making Change at Walmart

Typically, the extremely wealthy give a higher portion of their incomes to charity than middle and upper-middle income Americans. After all, you can only buy so many yachts, vacation homes, and Teslas before you start to look for other ways to spend money. But that doesn’t seem to be true for the Waltons, who’ve redefined what it means to be a Scrooge. Americans’ average net worth is about $650,000 per household (the median is only about $70,000), and the average annual charitable donation is about $3,000 per household. Meanwhile, the average Walton has a net worth of $36 billion and gives about $730,000 to charity each year. This means that the four richest Waltons have, on average, a net worth that’s 55,000 times higher than that of the average American household, yet give, as a percent of that wealth, about 1/230th as much to charity in a typical year:

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