Film Review: “The Hand That Feeds”


The Hand That Feeds

JUBILEE FILMS

At the beginning of The Hand That Feeds, Mahoma López, an undocumented Mexican immigrant, records a coworker counting out the $290 he’s just received for a 60-hour workweek in a deli on New York City’s ritzy Upper East Side. The film feels like a familiar tale of exploitation and wage theft, until López and his Hot & Crusty coworkers stand up and fight back. In this behind-the-scenes look at the ensuing labor dispute, directors Rachel Lears and Robin Blotnick lead us through the struggles and eventual triumph of López & Co. as they enlist the help of activists and, notably, a group of Occupy Wall Street-influenced twentysomethings. Despite the film’s narrow focus—which leaves out some much-needed context about the treatment of immigrants in the restaurant biz—it’s an inspiring tale.
 

Correction: The original version of this review, which appeared in our November/December issue, misidentified the person counting out money at the start of the film.

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