Why Don’t We Make Election Day A Holiday?

<a href="http://www.shutterstock.com/pic-133686086/stock-photo-ventura-country-ca-november-voters-at-polling-station-in-presidential-election-on.html?src=zGvGuQDvzSrnff3UdKEXOQ-1-3">American Spirit</a>/Shutterstock

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An estimated 37 percent of eligible voters cast ballots during Tuesday’s midterm elections—the lowest voter turnout since 1942. It wasn’t that much of an anomaly, however: For decades, voter turnout in non-presidential election years has hovered far below what it was in the mid-19th century, when it peaked at around 70 percent. The International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance ranks the United States 120th out of 169 countries for average voter turnout.

Today, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) proposed a way to reverse this trend: Make election day a national holiday. “Election day should be a national holiday so that everyone has the time and opportunity to vote,” Sanders said in a press release announcing the Democracy Day Act. “While this would not be a cure-all, it would indicate a national commitment to create a more vibrant democracy.”

Sadly, Congressional Republicans, who’ve made voter suppression a key part of their electoral strategy, are about as likely to support a voting holiday as they are to declare war on Christmas.

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You expect the big picture, and it's our job at Mother Jones to give it to you. And right now, so many of the troubles we face are the making not of a virus, but of the quest for profit, political or economic (and not just from the man in the White House who could have offered leadership and comfort but instead gave us bleach).

In "News Is Just Like Waste Management," we unpack what the coronavirus crisis has meant for journalism, including Mother Jones’, and how we can rise to the challenge. If you're able to, this is a critical moment to support our nonprofit journalism with a donation: We've scoured our budget and made the cuts we can without impairing our mission, and we hope to raise $400,000 from our community of online readers to help keep our big reporting projects going because this extraordinary pandemic-plus-election year is no time to pull back.

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