Listen to the Powerful, Firsthand Stories of Mexican Women Fighting Against Sexual Harassment


In the fall of 2012, Brooklyn-based artist Tatyana Fazlalizadeh launched “Stop Telling Women to Smile,” a project featuring posters with the faces of real women exposed to street harassment, oftentimes in the form of catcalling, paired with powerful quotes underneath. For Fazlalizadeh, the pieces served as a visual tool to directly address both harassers and women who experience harassment in their very own neighborhoods.

This past September, Fazlalizadeh brought “Stop Telling Women to Smile” to Mexico City, where women are subjected to a level of street harassment both pervasive and constant. Its own public transit system has been deemed one of the most dangerous for women in the world, a distinction that has given way to the use of single-sex buses and female-only subway cars in order to combat the city’s notorious harassment issues.

The new interactive, which debuted Monday on Fusion, tells the stories of 72 women, packaged with videos, locations, and a timeline outlining Fazlalizadeh’s time in Mexico City. The abroad iteration is titled “All the Time. Every Day” and features women of all ages–local politicians, students, and mothers included–and narratives detailing instances of verbal harassment and physical touching in public.

“I know that you would do it for free, but I will pay you to suck me off,” Adriana, one of the women included in the interactive, recounts being told by a man once.

“When I walk, I see men seeing me,” Ana, another women, describes. “That gets me really nervous. If you say something, you’re the bad one.”

It’s this sense of powerlessness that “All the Time. Every day” seeks to highlight, providing women a platform to address public abuse too often ignored by their larger community. Check out the project in its entirety at Fusion.

One More Thing

And it's a big one. Mother Jones is launching a new Corruption Project to do deep, time-intensive reporting on the corruption that is both the cause and result of the crisis in our democracy.

The more we thought about how Mother Jones can have the most impact right now, the more we realized that so many stories come down to corruption: People with wealth and power putting their interests first—and often getting away with it.

Our goal is to understand how we got here and how we might get out. We're aiming to create a reporting position dedicated to uncovering corruption, build a team, and let them investigate for a year—publishing our stories in a concerted window: a special issue of our magazine, video and podcast series, and a dedicated online portal so they don't get lost in the daily deluge of headlines and breaking news.

We want to go all in, and we've got seed funding to get started—but we're looking to raise $500,000 in donations this spring so we can go even bigger. You can read about why we think this project is what the moment demands and what we hope to accomplish—and if you like how it sounds, please help us go big with a tax-deductible donation today.

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our newsletters

Subscribe and we'll send Mother Jones straight to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate