Map: How States Are Handling Their Confederate Flag Problems

The decision to take down the flag in South Carolina has resonated in many places.

Protesters burn a paper Confederate flag during a rally in Los Angeles on Tuesday.Ringo Chiu/Zuma Press

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It didn’t take long after Dylann Storm Roof’s alleged murder of nine black church congregants last week in Charleston and the emergence of Roof’s website with many Confederate-related images for people in South Carolina to call for the removal of the Confederate flag from state Capitol grounds—or for others to defend its presence there. Gov. Nikki Haley’s announcement Monday that she supported taking down the flag led to a flurry of other public statements on the controversial symbol by GOP presidential hopefuls, state politicians, and even retailers like Amazon, eBay, and Walmart, which all announced that they would remove Confederate-flag merchandise from their inventory.

Here, in one map, is a compilation of the public statements and actions in each state about Confederate symbols that have occurred since the tragedy in Charleston.

The Confederate Symbol Under Fire

Click state for details.

 

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You expect the big picture, and it's our job at Mother Jones to give it to you. And right now, so many of the troubles we face are the making not of a virus, but of the quest for profit, political or economic (and not just from the man in the White House who could have offered leadership and comfort but instead gave us bleach).

In "News Is Just Like Waste Management," we unpack what the coronavirus crisis has meant for journalism, including Mother Jones’, and how we can rise to the challenge. If you're able to, this is a critical moment to support our nonprofit journalism with a donation: We've scoured our budget and made the cuts we can without impairing our mission, and we hope to raise $400,000 from our community of online readers to help keep our big reporting projects going because this extraordinary pandemic-plus-election year is no time to pull back.

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