Elizabeth Warren Wants the Federal Government to Encourage Research on Pot’s Medical Benefits

<a href="http://www.warren.senate.gov/?p=photos">Senate.gov</a> (Elizabeth Warren);<a href="http://www.shutterstock.com/cat.mhtml?lang=en&language=en&ref_site=photo&search_source=search_form&version=llv1&anyorall=all&safesearch=1&use_local_boost=1&autocomplete_id=&searchterm=medical%20marijuana&show_color_wheel=1&orient=&commercial_ok=&media_type=images&search_cat=&searchtermx=&photographer_name=&people_gender=&people_age=&people_ethnicity=&people_number=&color=&page=1&inline=231863464">Shutterstock/Biro Emoke </a> (green cross)


On Monday, Sen. Elizabeth Warren wrote a letter to top federal drug enforcement and health officials requesting that they do more to conduct and facilitate research on the health benefits of marijuana. Among other things, she urged the government to end its monopoly on the supply of pot for research purposes, coordinate large-scale epidemiological studies on marijuana use, and assure scientists that their work on pot won’t jeopardize their other federal research funding.

“While the federal government has emphasized research on the potential harms associated with the use of marijuana,” says the letter, which was signed by Warren and seven other Democratic senators, “there is still very limited research on the potential health benefits of marijuana—despite the fact that millions of Americans are now eligible by state law to use the drug for medical purposes.”

Last month, the Department of Health and Human Services made a widely publicized move to streamline the approval of medical-marijuana studies, but Warren argues that this should be just the start of a broader effort to legitimize and institutionalize research into the benefits of pot. Her letter urges HHS to conduct its own clinical trials and facilitate communication among the 23 states that have legalized pot as medicine “in order to derive a more accurate picture of marijuana use and treatments across the country.”

The senators also appear eager to see the government reevaluate marijuana’s listing under Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act, a category reserved for drugs, including heroin and LSD, that have “no currently accepted medical use.” They ask for a timeline for analyzing existing pot research and making a recommendation for re-scheduling the drug. Their letter also asks whether the analysis will include comparisons with tobacco and alcohol.

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