We Asked Republican Voters About Their Divided Party. Their Answers Were Amazing.

“It’s as if Trump did go into Cruz’s house and shoot his wife.”

 

On the third night of the GOP convention in Cleveland, Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas was drowned out by boos after refusing to endorse Donald Trump, his party’s nominee for president.

On Thursday morning, a defiant Cruz continued to ratchet up his war against Trump, declaring that he would not grovel “like a servile puppy.

Cruz’s speech seemed to once again expose deep fractures inside the Republican Party, after the Never Trump movement failed earlier this week to change the party’s rules to deny Trump the nomination. So I took to the streets to ask Republican voters on all sides of the divide—the pro-Trump types, the shrug-yeah-sure-Trump types, and the Never Trump types—about how the Republican Party can heal before November.

Cruz “was trying to reach those people who say ‘Never Trump,'” said Emily Redditt, an alternate delegate from Texas, as she defended her senator. “I can understand his reluctance to endorse.”

Joking that some Democrats would find a way to forgive President Barack Obama for anything, even if he shot their wife, kids, and dog, Redditt went on to say, “It’s as if Trump did go into Ted Cruz’s house and shoot his wife.” She added, however, that she would reluctantly vote for Trump in November.

Ariel White, a Trump supporter, was pessimistic about party unity and upset about Cruz’s speech. “It’s a hope and a prayer that we get the Republican Party back together,” she said. “For Trump, and for America.”

 

THE FACTS SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES.

At least we hope they will, because that’s our approach to raising the $350,000 in online donations we need right now—during our high-stakes December fundraising push.

It’s the most important month of the year for our fundraising, with upward of 15 percent of our annual online total coming in during the final week—and there’s a lot to say about why Mother Jones’ journalism, and thus hitting that big number, matters tremendously right now.

But you told us fundraising is annoying—with the gimmicks, overwrought tone, manipulative language, and sheer volume of urgent URGENT URGENT!!! content we’re all bombarded with. It sure can be.

So we’re going to try making this as un-annoying as possible. In “Let the Facts Speak for Themselves” we give it our best shot, answering three questions that most any fundraising should try to speak to: Why us, why now, why does it matter?

The upshot? Mother Jones does journalism you don’t find elsewhere: in-depth, time-intensive, ahead-of-the-curve reporting on underreported beats. We operate on razor-thin margins in an unfathomably hard news business, and can’t afford to come up short on these online goals. And given everything, reporting like ours is vital right now.

If you can afford to part with a few bucks, please support the reporting you get from Mother Jones with a much-needed year-end donation. And please do it now, while you’re thinking about it—with fewer people paying attention to the news like you are, we need everyone with us to get there.

payment methods

THE FACTS SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES.

At least we hope they will, because that’s our approach to raising the $350,000 in online donations we need right now—during our high-stakes December fundraising push.

It’s the most important month of the year for our fundraising, with upward of 15 percent of our annual online total coming in during the final week—and there’s a lot to say about why Mother Jones’ journalism, and thus hitting that big number, matters tremendously right now.

But you told us fundraising is annoying—with the gimmicks, overwrought tone, manipulative language, and sheer volume of urgent URGENT URGENT!!! content we’re all bombarded with. It sure can be.

So we’re going to try making this as un-annoying as possible. In “Let the Facts Speak for Themselves” we give it our best shot, answering three questions that most any fundraising should try to speak to: Why us, why now, why does it matter?

The upshot? Mother Jones does journalism you don’t find elsewhere: in-depth, time-intensive, ahead-of-the-curve reporting on underreported beats. We operate on razor-thin margins in an unfathomably hard news business, and can’t afford to come up short on these online goals. And given everything, reporting like ours is vital right now.

If you can afford to part with a few bucks, please support the reporting you get from Mother Jones with a much-needed year-end donation. And please do it now, while you’re thinking about it—with fewer people paying attention to the news like you are, we need everyone with us to get there.

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate