Trump Election Protests Continue to Erupt Across the Country

Police officials declared the demonstration in Portland, Oregon, a riot.

Alex Milan Tracy/AP


Demonstrators across the country continued to take to the streets on Thursday for a second night of protests to oppose the presidential election of Donald Trump, burning effigies of the new president-elect and shattering car windows.

In cities as diverse as New York, Dallas, Denver, and Minneapolis, tens of thousands of people chanting “not my president” and “move Trump, get out of the way” are estimated to have participated in the rallies. The events took a markedly more violent turn in Portland, Oregon, where law enforcement officials declared the demonstrations on Thursday a “riot.” At least 26 people were arrested.

The scene in Portland, Oregon.

Earlier in the day, thousands of students in various cities staged a massive walk out to express their anger over the election results.

In Oakland, California, where at least 30 people had been arrested the night before, protesters continued to pour into major highways and temporarily blocked Interstate 580. Police described the protests as “unlawful.”

Trump took to the Twitter on Thursday to blame the media for inciting the various protests.

But by Friday morning, he appeared to reverse course, attempting to strike a more conciliatory pledge to unite all Americans.

More anti-Trump demonstrations are scheduled for this weekend.

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