Fired, Resigned, Sidelined, Ousted. Here’s the 2017 Class of Trump Exiles.

Who will you miss the most?

What do the flamboyant Anthony “The Mooch” Scaramucci and the stolid former FBI director James Comey have in common?

They are two members of an exclusive group of people who lost their official jobs during Trump’s first year as president. Some, like Sally Yates, the former Acting US Attorney General, and James Comey, were long-time government officials, just trying to do their jobs before Trump fired them. Former Press Secretary Sean Spicer took matters into his own hands and resigned, while former White House Chief-of-Staff Reince Priebus was fired after Trump elevated Anthony Scaramucci to the post of White House communications director.  (“The Mooch” lasted for ten days before he was ousted.) 

And there are more. From January 2017 until December, hardly a month passed without a high-profile resignation, firing, or official escorted off the White House grounds. Watch the video above for an end-of-the-year round up of the battered and bruised class of 2017.

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THE BIG PICTURE

You expect the big picture, and it's our job at Mother Jones to give it to you. And right now, so many of the troubles we face are the making not of a virus, but of the quest for profit, political or economic (and not just from the man in the White House who could have offered leadership and comfort but instead gave us bleach).

In "News Is Just Like Waste Management," we unpack what the coronavirus crisis has meant for journalism, including Mother Jones’, and how we can rise to the challenge. If you're able to, this is a critical moment to support our nonprofit journalism with a donation: We've scoured our budget and made the cuts we can without impairing our mission, and we hope to raise $400,000 from our community of online readers to help keep our big reporting projects going because this extraordinary pandemic-plus-election year is no time to pull back.

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