Retired Justice John Paul Stevens Says Kavanaugh Should Not Be on Supreme Court

He said the nominee’s behavior during Thursday’s hearing changed his mind.

Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens said on Thursday that Brett Kavanaugh should not be confirmed to the Supreme Court, citing the nominee’s behavior during last week’s hearing. 

“I thought [Kavanaugh] definitely had the qualifications to sit on the Supreme Court and should be confirmed if he was ever selected, but I’ve changed my views for reasons that have, really, no relationship to his intellectual ability or his record as a federal judge,” Stevens said during an event in Boca Raton, Florida, according to the Palm Beach Post. “I think that his performance during the hearings caused me to change my mind.”

Other commentators had noted that Kavanaugh’s comments during the hearing showed a partisan bias and could affect his position on the Supreme Court, and Stevens agreed. “I think there’s merit to that criticism and I think the senators should really pay attention that,” he said. 

Stevens remarks come as the Senate heads closer to a final confirmation vote for Kavanaugh, likely Saturday. 

Watch his full comments here:

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