Pelosi Officially Disinvites Trump From Giving State of the Union Address

Hours later, the president finally conceded and said he’d deliver the address after the government reopened.

Roll Call/AP

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Update, 1/24, 7:20 a.m. EST: Late Wednesday, President Trump said that he would concede to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and deliver the State of the Union after the government reopens. 

Update, 2:37 p.m. EST: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said that she would not allow a vote on a resolution for the State of the Union, effectively barring President Trump from delivering his address in the US House chamber.

Previously:

It took an entire week, but on Wednesday, President Donald Trump finally responded to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s recommendation to postpone the State of the Union address until after the government reopens, saying that he would deliver the speech as originally planned in the chamber of the US House.

Trump claimed that after speaking to officials at the Defense Department and the Secret Service, he concluded that Pelosi’s security concerns due to the partial government shutdown were unfounded. “Therefore I will be honoring your invitation, and fulfilling my Constitutional duty, to deliver important information to the people and Congress of the United States of America regarding the State of our Union,” Trump wrote in the letter.

“It would be so very sad for our Country if the State of the Union were not delivered on time, on schedule, and very importantly, on location!”

This is a breaking news post. We will update as more information becomes available.

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You expect the big picture, and it's our job at Mother Jones to give it to you. And right now, so many of the troubles we face are the making not of a virus, but of the quest for profit, political or economic (and not just from the man in the White House who could have offered leadership and comfort but instead gave us bleach).

In "News Is Just Like Waste Management," we unpack what the coronavirus crisis has meant for journalism, including Mother Jones’, and how we can rise to the challenge. If you're able to, this is a critical moment to support our nonprofit journalism with a donation: We've scoured our budget and made the cuts we can without impairing our mission, and we hope to raise $400,000 from our community of online readers to help keep our big reporting projects going because this extraordinary pandemic-plus-election year is no time to pull back.

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