Health Care Workers: What Policy Changes Has Your Employer Made Since Roe v. Wade Was Overturned?

Help our reporters cover the ramifications of the Dobbs decision.

Pro-choice demonstrators, including Emma Harris, left, and Ellie Small, center, both students at George Washington University gather in front of the Supreme Court of the United States on Tuesday, May 3, 2022 in Washington, DC.Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times/Getty

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When the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, Republican-led states quickly implemented severe abortion restrictions and outright bans. This left hospitals, pharmacies, medical practices, and other health care providers scrambling to interpret the new laws and communicate policy changes to employees. Already, we’ve seen reports of OB-GYNs hesitating to terminate unviable pregnancies that are endangering the health of a pregnant person because the fetus still has a heartbeat, and of pharmacists refusing to fill prescriptions for non-pregnant women of childbearing age because the medication could cause miscarriages.

If you are a health care professional working in a state that has enacted new anti-abortion laws, we want to hear from you about how your employer has changed its policies to comply with these measures. Ideally, we would like to see the emails, memoranda, and other internal documents conveying these new directives, so we can better report on the implications of the Supreme Court’s Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization decision. Contact us at motherjones.com or, to communicate via secure Protonmail (you’ll need a free account for yourself), email mother_jones_mag at protonmail.com. Use the subject line: “Abortion policies.”

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Straight to the point: Donations have been concerningly slow for our hugely important First $500,000 fundraising campaign. We urgently need your help, and a lot of help, over the next few weeks so we can pay for the one-of-a-kind journalism you get from us.

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