Sen. Clinton's ACLU Score Takes A Bit Of A Dive; Obama's Stays About the Same

| Wed Oct. 3, 2007 2:09 PM EDT

In April, I reported on the most current ACLU scores of some senators, and Sen. Hillary Clinton had a score of 83%. The new scores have been pubished, and Clinton's latest score is 67%, 16 points down from last time. Clinton voted for the Baucus/Tester Amendment, which defeated a motion to table the Immigration Reform Act of 2007, which expands Real ID legislation. She also voted against the Bennett Amendment (which passed), which removed from the Lobbying Transparency and Accountability Act a provision which would have made grassroots lobbying very difficult and mired in paperwork.

Clinton voted against expanded government spying powers, for cloture that would have permitted consideration of a vote to restore Habeas Corpus rights, for cloture to allow a vote on the Kennedy-Smith amendment (expansion of hate crimes legislation to include sexual orientation, gender identification, gender, and disability), and against the use of government-issued photo ID cards by voters.

Sen. Barack Obama has a score of 80%, and Sen. John McCain has a score of 50%, which appears to be an improvement over his last score of 33%, but there's a catch: McCain was absent for 2/3 of the votes.

Sen. Majority Leader Harry Reid has maintained his 67% score. In the past, the leader of the Senate Democrats had scored as low as 40%.