New Study Takes On Veteran Suicides

| Tue Aug. 11, 2009 2:56 PM EDT

Welcome to the Army. You're not suicidal, are you?

Questions like this may become routine: the Washington Post reported yesterday that the military is developing required surveys for all new soldiers and the 90,000 already serving. The new panel creating the surveys is also conducting the largest-ever study of military suicides. The study's goal is twofold: prevent military suicides, and determine the causes of suicide.

Last month, Gen. Peter W. Chiarelli, the Army's vice chief of staff, told the Senate Armed Services Committee that for veteran suicides, "The most frustrating thing is trying to find a cause." The overwhelming evidence that depression and self-destructive behavior are  results of war must have slipped his mind. The $50 million, five-year study that the National Institute of Mental Health and the Army launched earlier this year is what the Post calls "an ambitious attempt to solve the mystery." The research was prompted by a rapid increase in soldier suicides, which reached 143 in 2008—the highest since the Army began keeping count three decades ago. Professors from Harvard, Columbia, and the University of Michigan sit on the panel of experts, ready to crack the case.

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