Florida Gov. Rakes in Campaign Cash From CEO Who Makes Millions Locking Up Immigrants

Rick Scott will headline a $10,000 per person fundraiser at a notorious private prison company's CEO's home.

| Fri Jul. 18, 2014 11:02 AM EDT
Florida Governor Rick Scott (R)

Florida Governor Rick Scott really knows how to pick a fundraiser. Last month, he was scheduled to attend a $10,000-a-plate event at the home of a real estate developer who'd done prison time on tax charges. Hours after Mother Jones disclosed the event, Scott canceled it. Now, on July 21, Scott will headline a $10,000 per person fundraiser at the Boca Raton home of another deep pocketed donor who is the CEO of a private prison company that's profiting handsomely over the immigration crisis at the Mexican border.

George Zoley is one of the founders of the GEO Group, the second-largest private prison company in the country. Among the 98 facilities the company owns or manages are several detention centers for undocumented immigrants run through contracts with the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency. One of those is a facility in Broward County, Florida, that's been the site of at least one hunger strike and protests over allegedly poor treatment of the 700 immigrants held there, most of whom have no serious criminal histories.

In 2012, members of Congress demanded that ICE investigate the Broward facility after reports the center was holding people who should have been released and that it was not providing adequate medical care to the detainees. An investigation last year by Americans for Immigrant Justice also found credible reports of detainees suffering food poisoning from being served rotten food. The group noted instances of sexual assault among detainees and inadequate mental health care that may have contributed to at least three suicide attempts. Detainees also reported being forced to work for $1 a day and to pay $3 a minute for phone calls.

The Geo Group, which rakes in $1.5 billion in annual revenue, earns $20 million annually just from the Florida center.

 

 

Advertise on MotherJones.com

The GEO Group also operates the Adelanto Detention Center that, with 1,300 beds for men, is the largest immigrant detention center in southern California. In 2012, a detainee there died from pneumonia. The US Department of Homeland Security's Office of Detention Oversight concluded that the man's death was preventable. Investigators determined that the medical staff had "provided an unacceptable level of care" and commit "several egregious errors" that led to the man's death. Immigration reform advocates have reported various forms of abuse at the Adelanto facility: maggots in the food, inadequate medical treatment, mistreatment by the GEO staff, and the overuse of solitary confinement. These allegations landed the center on the nonprofit Detention Watch Network's list of the worst detention facilities in the country.

The GEO Group is now expanding the Adelanto facility to add another 650 beds, which includes a women's wing. The GEO Group expects the expansion to result in an additional $21 million a year in revenue. The GEO Group has also invested heavily in lobbying Congress, spending more than $3 million over the past decade to keep the money flowing to its detention centers.

Zoley netted $22 million in compensation from the GEO Group between 2008 and 2012. He's donated a fair bit to the GOP and to Scott, who's made privatizing Florida's jails and prisons a priority of his administration. Zoley accompanied the governor to the UK in 2012 on a trade mission. The Geo Group donated $25,000 to Scott's inauguration, and Zoley also personally donated $20,000 to help spiff up Scott's living quarters in the governor's mansion

Zoley's sponsorship of a fundraiser for Scott, who is in a tight race against former governor Charlie Crist, a Republican turned Democrat, isn't surprising. (Scott's office did not respond to a request for comment.) But the governor's cozy relationship with the operator of some of the country's biggest immigrant detention centers might not go over well with Latino constituents, who tend to oppose federal immigration detention policies.

Scott's relationship with Latino voters is already shaky. Earlier this year, his top fundraiser and finance co-chair, who is Cuban-American, quit after complaining that two of Scott's senior campaign staffers were mocking Latinos by speaking in Speedy Gonzales accents on the way to Chipotle. (Scott's office denied the charge.) A few days later, another prominent Latino Republican quit the Miami-Dade Expressway Authority board in solidarity. He wrote, "The Hispanic Community of South Florida is a key component of this great State’s vibrant socio-political fabric and treating us as you have is a grave mistake as it pains me to tell you what you will find out to the chagrin of us loyal Republicans. Good Luck Governor, I’m not a fan any longer."

Get Mother Jones by Email - Free. Like what you're reading? Get the best of MoJo three times a week.