November/December 1994 issue

Cover Story

SO, COMEBACK, KID
by Eric Alterman
To turn things around, Clinton will have to rediscover the populism he ran on.

 What do you do when you've bought your dream home and suddenly the neighborhood becomes more dangerous? What do you do if you're a hard-working immigrant trying to better your life, but other people want you to get the hell out?

-- Walled Off

WALLED OFF
by Dale Maharidge
It's becoming common in California--cities divided between whites who fear crime and immigrants who want jobs.

Wilson's Way: A failing governor turns racial fears into votes.

What SOS Means: Cultural war in the Golden State.

JUST AS FIERCE
by Katherine Dunn
Does women's equality extend to the capacity for aggression?
PLUS: An online debate on gender differences.

VIRTUAL VIETNAM
by Jim Frederick
It doesn't have a sound track (yet). But Vietnam is rapidly becoming "'Nam: The Movie."

LEGALIZE IT!
by Michael Castleman Why can't U.S. herbs carry health information? The FDA won't let them.

Herbal Remedies: Your guide to natural cures

SO, COMEBACK, KID
by Eric Alterman
To turn things around, Clinton will have to rediscover the populism he ran on.

LET'S TALK CLINTON
by Michael Krasny
Twenty unofficial advisers tell Bill how to fight back in the second round.

THE SALMON ARE CALLING
by Brad Matsen
Why the great fish are dying, and what we can do.

COMIC THREAT
by Sean Henry
A jury was appalled by Michael Diana's comics. Now all his papers are subject to warrantless search and seizure.

DEPARTMENTS

EDITOR'S NOTE Clinton must create a vision worth fighting for.
BACKTALK Backtalk: Ishmael Reed on race and O.J.; Paul Begala agrees that Dick Gephardt is stiff; young activists hash it out; world toilets, redux.
OUTFRONT
Confessions of a fire starter
Duck-shooting congressmen
Composting toxics
Shameless self-promotion
Management's worst nightmare
Better dry-cleaning
Population bomb update
RESOURCES For further reading and advanced hellraising.
FASTTALK Some electronic readers respond in advance to Katherine Dunn's story.
PAULA POUNDSTONE State senator for a day.
PLUS: letters to Paula