Monika Bauerlein


Since taking the helm at Mother Jones in 2006, Monika and editor-in-chief Clara Jeffery have won two National Magazine Awards, launched a nine-person Washington bureau, relaunched the website, given birth, and forgotten what it’s like to sleep.

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Monika Bauerlein is CEO of Mother Jones. Previously, she served as co-editor with Clara Jeffery, who is now editor-in-chief. Together, they spearheaded an era of editorial growth and innovation, marked by two National Magazine Awards for general excellence, the addition of a 12-person Washington Bureau, and an overhaul of the organization’s digital strategy that grew's traffic more than tenfold. She has also worked as Mother Jones' investigative editor, focusing on long-form projects marrying in-depth reportage, document sleuthing, and narrative appeal, and as an alternative-weekly editor, a correspondent for US and European publications in Washington, D.C. and at the United Nations, an AP stringer, corporate trainer, translator, sausage slinger and fishing-line packager. She lives in Oakland.

Woodward, Kissinger, Vietnam--Let's Do The Time Warp Again

| Sun Oct. 1, 2006 1:13 AM EDT

Oh well, the folks at the Post must have gotten extra server space for this one, so head on over and check out the Woodward-gets-religion show for yourself. Among the bits we haven't seen in the wall-to-wall coverage of "State of Denial" are some very disturbing ones, to wit:

A powerful, largely invisible influence on Bush's Iraq policy was former secretary of state Kissinger.

"Of the outside people that I talk to in this job," Vice President Cheney told me in the summer of 2005, "I probably talk to Henry Kissinger more than I talk to anybody else. He just comes by and, I guess at least once a month, Scooter [his then-chief of staff, I. Lewis Libby] and I sit down with him."

The president also met privately with Kissinger every couple of months, making him the most regular and frequent outside adviser to Bush on foreign affairs.

Kissinger sensed wobbliness everywhere on Iraq, and he increasingly saw it through the prism of the Vietnam War. For Kissinger, the overriding lesson of Vietnam is to stick it out.

In his writing, speeches and private comments, Kissinger claimed that the United States had essentially won the war in 1972, only to lose it because of the weakened resolve of the public and Congress.

In a column in The Washington Post on Aug. 12, 2005, titled "Lessons for an Exit Strategy," Kissinger wrote, "Victory over the insurgency is the only meaningful exit strategy."

He delivered the same message directly to Bush, Cheney and Hadley at the White House.

Victory had to be the goal, he told all. Don't let it happen again. Don't give an inch, or else the media, the Congress and the American culture of avoiding hardship will walk you back.

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They've known about Foley for almost a YEAR?

| Sun Oct. 1, 2006 12:47 AM EDT

One of the many questions that beg answering in the Foley disaster: How exactly, now that we've all lived through a decade's worth of Catholic priest scandal and outrage over institutional hierarchy whitewashing--how, after all that, do you go from late 2005 to September 2006 convincing yourself that "suspiciously friendly" emails from a powerful man to a teenage boy are not a problem? How, Bishop Hastert?

Now for the cluelessness sweepstakes:

Rich Galen, a Republican political strategist, worried that voters might lump Foley's name with former representatives Robert W. Ney (R-Ohio), Tom DeLay (R-Tex.) and Randy "Duke" Cunningham (R-Calif.), all of whom were forced to resign or were indicted amid various scandals this year.

No, Rich. You'd be lucky if people thought this was only as bad as Ney/DeLay/Duke.

Free Trade Love

| Fri Sep. 29, 2006 4:17 AM EDT

Via PR Watch (whose other current endeavor is "The Best War Ever," a book exposing disinformation and deception around the Iraq War), this lovely bit on Seoul's efforts to promote the Bush administration's latest free-trade idea, a pact with Korea:

The "Korea-U.S. FTA Love Corner" established in the lobby of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade in downtown Seoul symbolizes the government's belief that aggressive publicity would result in a successful FTA pact.

Response so far, reports the Korea Herald, has been "lukewarm."

Hurricane W

| Thu Sep. 28, 2006 1:32 AM EDT

Climate science censorship, Chapter MMCVIII: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has reviewed the latest hurricane science and, like everyone else in the universe, has concluded that the data suggest that climate change is creating bigger and worse storms. But the White House, reports Nature (via the AP) feels the report is too "technical" and has blocked its release.

Nuff said.

Bush's Great Awakening (And Great Smelling of Coffee)

| Wed Sep. 13, 2006 4:15 AM EDT

Don't miss Peter Baker's story about Bush telling conservative reporters that the nation is going through a "Third Awakening" of religious devotion as a result of the war on terror. This will come as news to some historians who believe we're already due for the Fourth or the Fifth in the Great Awakenings series. Then again, there's Robert William Fogel, the University of Chicago Nobel laureate who maintains that we're witnessing the political consequences of the Fourth Great Awakening, the rise of charismatic, evangelical, and pentecostal expressions of faith in the second half of the 20th century. The thrust of this movement includes, according to Fogel, an "attack on materialist corruption; rise of pro-life, pro-family, and media reform movements; campaign for more value-oriented school curriculum; expansion of tax revolt; attack on entitlements; return to a belief in equality of opportunity." Among Fogel's devotees, it seems, is Karl Rove. Now for that "return to a belief in equality of opportunity" part...

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