May/June 2005 Contributors
















Contributors | May/June 2005


Bill McKibben (“Climate of Denial”) is a contributing writer to Mother Jones and the author of several books, including his most recent, Wandering Home: A Long Walk Across America’s Most Hopeful Landscape, Vermont’s Champlain Valley and New York’s Adirondacks.


Chris Mooney (“Some Like It Hot”) is a senior correspondent
for the American Prospect, where he helped create the popular blog Tapped. His writing focuses on the intersection of science and politics, and his first book, The Republican War on Science, will be published in September.


Ross Gelbspan (“Snowed”) is the author of The Heat
Is On: The Climate Crisis, the Cover-up, the Prescription
, which caused a stir in 1998 when President
Clinton told the press he was reading it. His latest book, Boiling Point, lays out policies to address
the climate crisis.


Rob Waters (“Medicating Aliah”) has written extensively
on the use of psychiatric medication by children. Last year he revealed in the San Francisco Chronicle that the FDA suppressed an internal report linking antidepressants to an increased risk of suicide among children, a story that led to congressional hearings and warnings being issued for the drugs.


Bill McKibben
Chris Mooney
Rob Waters











James Nachtwey
Mark Schapiro
Lauren Slater

Philip Gourevitch (“Ghost Children of Big Mango”) is editor of the Paris Review and the author of We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed With Our Families: Stories From Rwanda, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award in 1998, and A Cold Case.


James Nachtwey (“Ghost Children of Big Mango”) started work as a newspaper photographer in New Mexico. His first foreign assignment was in Northern Ireland during the 1981 IRA hunger strike. Since then, he has devoted himself to documenting wars, conflicts, and critical social issues.


Mark Schapiro (“The Middleman”) is editorial director
of the Center for Investigative Reporting. In researching this story about the underground nuclear
trade, Schapiro said he felt like he “was entering a Dashiell Hammett novel of the nuclear
age.”

Michael Scherer (“The Side Effects of Truth”) is
Mother Jones’ Washington correspondent. His most recent story for the magazine, “Make
Your Taxes Disappear!
” (March/ April 2005), reported on new tax cuts for corporations.

Lauren Slater (“Genius Envy”) is the author of Opening Skinner’s Box: Great Psychological Experiments of the 20th Century. Her first book of fiction, Blue Beyond Blue, a collection of fairy tales for the techno-medical era, will be published in June.